April 21, 1905 – Busy Sewing for Mother’s Trip to Benton Harbor

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.

 

Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
9 Walnut St.
Hot Springs, Ark

2730 Kenwood Ave
Indianapolis, Indiana
April 21, 1905

Dear Homer,

Your letter was received ok and I should have answered it sooner but have been so busy. Mother leaves tomorrow at 7:00 A.M. for Benton Harbor and I have been sewing for her and helping her get ready to go. She will stay until late fall or early winter – I think. She sends her sincere regards to you Homer and would have you be a good boy. When you get this she will be in the Harbor and I shall be one of the most lonesome of people.

Forgive me for neglecting you Homer, but how are you? I hope you are in good health, as you generally are. Are you not glad Spring is here? Don’t you know that I just detest cold weather of late? I would live in a warm climate if I was able, at all times. I think. What are you doing? Have you the same mates yet? Have you changed homes as often as you did here? Or, are they more to your liking there?

O, where shall you spend Easter? I hope that you have a pleasant one. I shall try to, although I shall miss mother very much.

How is your mother? Really Homer I don’t know any thing to tell you, friend, except what you know. Well, I think I shall stop. Are you not glad? For you can’t read this, can you?

Please write as often as you have time Homer for I know you are busy.

Yours Sincerely
Pearl Reed

______________________

March 20, 1905 – Sorry to Read Homer’s Letter

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.

 

Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
9 Walnut St.
Hot Springs, Ark

2730 Kenwood Ave
Indianapolis, Ind
March 20, 1905

Dear Homer;
I received your strange letter an hour or so ago about 5:45 o’clock. I was glad to hear from you, but very sorry to read that letter Homer.

You must think me terribly hard hearted and cruel to think that I would tell or insinuate to her that she was not wanted with us. I should not expect anyone to do that for me, as I’ve often told you.

You must see Homer that we can’t agree or understand one another, and so I shall say Good-by I am sorry Homer it is so, but it is.

I think I am doing my duty to my mother, as I ever hope to do.

Good-by
Good-by
Pearl Doris Reed

March 10, 1905 – Homer Sends Music and 50 Stamps. Hugh Whistles.

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.

 

Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
9 Walnut St.
Hot Springs, Ark

2730 Kenwood Ave.
Indianapolis, In
March 10, 1905

Dear Homer;

Your letter, stamps and music were received o.k. and I am very grateful to you. Since I wrote to you I’ve learned that the song mentioned is quite old and Hugh seems to have whistled it in a very long time and heard it at the theater. I do not like it a bit less for all that. I think it very sweet and sad and mother likes it too.

I asked you when you were coming back and for answer you sent me 50 stamps. Do you mean to be away until they are used? If I should write each week, why they would last 12 months and one half. Do you mean to remain away that long Homer? In asking you that, I did not imply that you should pay me postage sir.

You spoke of the fire, Homer, well “my” paper said “The exact area burned over is 104 ½ acres” and also, “It is impossible to give a close estimate of the losses or the insurances. Probably a million dollars ($1,000,000) is not too high and may not be high enough. Insurance will not reach 50% of losses.”

The game of “Pit” is played with cards that resemble ordinary playing cards. All of the different grains are mentioned and worth from 35 to 100 points. The players try to corner all of one grain and when they do so they receive to their credit whatever it’s worth. The game has 500 points in all. Very interesting. Think you would like it. I did then.

You asked me whom or who accompanied me to Allen Chapel; well I will inform you “mother and Hugh.”

Have you heard from home and friends lately? How are your mother and brother?

Forgive me Homer and how are you? I forgot to ask. I am very well; and very busy just at present. Mother wanted to go to Benton Harbor this spring and I did not so, I think I’m big girl tho to remain at home. Have I tired you Homer with this stuff? I am sure I have. You must write and tell me all about yourself and mates and O everything. It is almost 11:30 P.M. and I am sleepy so just,

Good night
Pearl

___________________

I looked for the song “Down on The Farm” on youtube, alas, I could not find it. I did find the sheet music, which I gather Homer sent and Pearl would have played on the piano, or the guitar.

Click the link for more about Harry Von Tilzer, the author of this and many popular songs.

March 2, 1905 – Delighted With Stereoscopic Views, a Big Fire and Neglect of MacFadden’s Program

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.

 

Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
9 Walnut St.
Hot Springs, Ark

2730 Kenwood Ave
Indianapolis Ind.
March 2, 1905

Dear Homer

Your paper was received and I thank you for sending it to me. Very glad to hear that your mother is improving so nicely and that you will not be obliged to return home. It seems strange that it all happens while you are away but it seems that way, that when we would most have things do nicely and run smoothly – it most assuredly goes just the contrary.

You asked me if I still followed the advice of Mr. McFadden. Well to speak confidentially I think that I’ve neglected in some things, but the main and most important, I have followed closely as I hope ever to do. I am sorry that you have neglected also.

Our fire, which you mentioned, was not so very bad Homer, only about one half a block. Of course it was bad in a way it burned and smoked for two days. I have forgotten the cause of it, if indeed I ever knew. I was not interested in it, only that through it many poor men would find employment. The building at the corner of Mer(idian) & Wash(ington) the S.W. Cor(ner) is being torn down to make room for a large department store of L.S. Ayres.

O Homer, I almost forgot to tell you that I visited Allen Chapel Sunday Eve. There was an illustrated sermon with stereoscopic views, which was very good. Don’t you know I never tire of them. When I was real little I would be delighted with a series of these pictures and I am almost the same now. There was one set of pictures accompanied by a beautiful song entitled the or I should have said “Down on the Farm” which I thought just lovely. I never heard it before and I think I shall try and get it if I can.

Last night we had some company and someone had brought the game of “Pit”. It derived it’s name from it’s allusions to Wall Street. Really Homer it is great. I really enjoyed it.

I have tried your patience surely I know haven’t I, Homer. O, it takes so much scribbling to say such a little, where as in speaking in only a few minutes we can say so much.

When are you coming home or, I beg your pardon, back to Indianapolis?

Sincerely
Pearl Doris Reed

______________

February 6, 1905 – Pearl Accused of a Flighty Disposition & Illness in Homer’s Family

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.
Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
9 Walnut St.
Hot Springs, Ark

2730 Kenwood Ave
Indianapolis IN
February 6, 1905

Dear Homer;

Your letter was received a few hours ago and I find you as obstinate as ever.

Homer I am so very sorry for your mother and for your family generally. They have had so much of sickness lately that your poor mother must be nearly broken down. It is too bad that she is ill now, just when your brother needs her attention so much. Will you be needed at home? I hope not. That is I hope it will not be required of you to come home.

Minnie and family left for home this morning. She would like to hear from you sometime. Her address is #596 McCallister Ave B.H. Michigan.

Homer, our acquaintance was very pleasant to me, I am only sorry that you did not find it so, and were continually finding fault with me. You are not aware of the fact, that you are the first and only person who ever told me that I was of a “flighty disposition”. You seem to understand me better than anyone that I’ve came in contact with Homer, it seems that you should know why I did not turn to you?

Remember, I am only sorry for my “flighty disposition” in so much as it displeases you, I detest to displease anyone.

It seems that I’ve been very, very, willful, disagreeably flighty and everything else that I should not, Homer, in your eyes. Since all confidence is lost, why I think the case is hopeless. I should not care for anyone that I had no faith in and I do not think that anyone loves without it. I do not think, I should care for that one at any rate, for it would not satisfy me.

Glad to hear that you are doing so nicely and getting acquainted and being invited out so often. It must be cheerful to have two roommates? Pleased that your cold is better. Sorry the weather there is so various and disagreeable. Ours is lovely here.

Love from all
Sincerely Pearl D. Reed

January 27, 1905 – Minnie and Family Visiting, All Are Sick & Pearl Takes a Walk

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.
Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
9 Walnut St.
Hot Springs, Ark

2730 Kenwood Ave
Indianapolis Ind
January 27, 1905

Mr. Jarrett;
Homer, your letter was received O.K. Very glad to hear from you so soon. How are you? Hope you are well as I am.
We are having very cold weather here just now and have had several heavy snows. We received a letter from James Mullins and he said they were having very severe weather in Michigan and that at the time he was writing they were having a blizzard.

Minnie and family are with us still. All of them are quite ill this evening with severe colds and fever She sends her best regards to you. I have been quite busy serving for her for a few days and today being clear, bright and sharp, I went for a walk about 2:30 PM. I walked all the way to the Library and back. You have no idea, how I enjoyed the walk Homer. I felt rather blue when I left home, but, by the time I reached it again, thought life was worth living after all. Really there is nothing like walking to cause you to forget your pretty troubles and ills, I think. Don’t you think so too? The book I got is “Bayou Folk,” by Kate Chopin. Have you read it, or any of her works?

Are you interested in the Russian Rebellion? I feel very sorry for them, the poor ones I mean, and I hope that they will get their rights and desires in the end, but I wonder if they sympathized with the poor negro when he was in as bad, if not worse, a plight as themselves. All of the Czar’s troubles are coming at once, it seems. The “Japs” proved too much for them and then the “people” turned as it were, on them. I think his son that he longed and prayed for has brought him ill luck so far.

I have not been any place lately and Hugh and I shall go to the Grand Opera House Saturday if nothing happens to prevent it. I do not think that I have seen the play. It is “Paul Conchas”, something that Hugh has seen before and liked I suppose.

Homer, tell me about yourself won’t you? You never tell me what you are doing at all. Are you not glad you are not here in this severe weather. I envy you your location just now. Please pity us poor mortals Homer.
You think I shall never finish. Do you not? Well, I am after all.

All send love and best wishes to you. O, have you become acquainted with many yet? Write some Homer. Yours Sincerely,
Pearl Doris Reed

________________

When I first read this letter, I thought that my grandmother Pearl and her brother were going to an opera.  I was impressed. When I looked a bit further, I found that Paul Conchas was not an opera singer but a strong man juggler who performed in vaudeville opera houses around the country.

Hugh Marion Reed Averette – Pearl’s older brother.

 

paul conchas The_Indianapolis_News_Tue__Jan_24__1905

Stories of the Russian revolt were all over the newspapers during that time. Interesting that my grandmother Pearl was already interested in the news and in relating it to black people.

January 18, 1905 – Shall We Cease Writing?

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.
Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
9 Walnut St.
Hot Springs, Ark

2731 Kenwood Ave
Indianapolis Ind.
January 18, 1905

Mr. Jarrett;

Homer, having just returned from a long walk with Helen, Jim and Ben, I wish to speak with you. I shall pretend that I see you and I can get on nicer or better. Homer I am sorry that our short acquaintance was so very disappointing to you and that I was and am so very contrary and flighty but you will see Homer, that I can’t be otherwise I could not if I tried. Of course I shall not say that I do try – for I should speak untrue. Maybe it is just as well that we did not go any more than we did together.

Listen, you speak of the gifts from you to me. Why, Homer, I would have given them back to you because I did not think myself worthy of them, do you understand? I was and am proud of the books and the parasol and shall always be and love them.

But Homer, listen if you do not believe anything that I say any more, don’t you think that I better cease writing to you? You do not care for me or you would trust me. Do you know that people generally trust those that they truly care for? Do you always expect proofs of things? Do you never think of trusting anybody, even those you profess to care for? Homer, this being the case I think we should cease to correspond, don’t you? You do and would not believe anything I should say and so it would be all of no avail.

Mother is getting on nicely and sends her best regards to you and advises you to be a good boy.

Minnie and family are quite well. They send love and best wishes to you. The children often speak of you to me.

Love from all to you.

Glad you heard from your mother and that she is well.

Our church is carrying on revival now and I think I shall attend tomorrow night.

Homer, Good By
Yours Sincerely,
Pearl D. Reed

________________

In January of 1905, Minnie Mullins and her four children were visiting Indianapolis from Benton Harbor, Michigan. Minnie was 27 years old. She was the mother of four children – Helen, Jim, Ben and Arthur.

January 15, 1905 – Mother Better and Homer Describes Mountains

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.

 

Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
9 Walnut St.
Hot Springs, Ark

2730 Kenwood Ave.
Indianapolis, Ind
January 15, 1905

Dear Homer,

Your letter was received with delight. Was so glad to hear from you. Do you believe it? Of course you don’t. You never believed a thing I told you, do you, friend? Forgive me Homer, I did not mean to annoy you, and I forget that this year I was not to quarrel, not to worry anyone, if I could possibly avoid it.

Your scenic description was splendid, I could almost picture myself there among the mountains. So glad to hear that you have a church so very near you and that you are so pleased with your surroundings.

Mother is much better now. She sends her love to you. Do you believe it? Mr. Mullins and family are quite well. She sends her best regard to you. There is nothing of unusual happening that I know of Homer, to tell you of now so I shall say good-night.

Please write soon
Yours sincerely
Pearl D. Reed.

_________

Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas. Wikipedia Commons

January 2, 1905 – Mother Ill and Homer In Hot Springs, Arkansas

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.
Pearl Reed

Mr. Homer Jarrett
#9 Walnut St.
Hot Springs, Ark.

2730 Kenwood Ave
Ind, Ind.
Jan. 2nd/05

Mr. Jarrett;
Dear Homer,

Your letter was gladly received today.

I was very disappointed to find that the other one was for your mother instead of me. I would have sent it on to her but you never cared to tell me her address, but I shall send it as I send this to you. I wonder if she would be angry if she knew to whom it had been sent?

Homer you have no idea how much you are missed, of course you are not out very often, but, we knew that you were here.

Sorry you did not see Minnie and family they send their love to you. Did you see Wilson before you left? I heard that he was looking for you, but I did not see him myself.

Mother is very ill with tonsillitis. She is sorry that you left without telling her goodbye, and sends her love and best wishes to you.

I am growing sleepy Homer and I shall cease for this time. It is just 12:30 o’clock. All are asleep but me and mother.

O, Homer tell me all that happens will you? Remember nothing will be too trivial, for I shall be interested in all that you do and everything that happens to you.

Write very very soon.
Yours ever sincerely,
Pearl D. Reed

__________________

Wilson Mullins was Mr. James Mullins younger brother. He was a chef and owned a cafe for several years. I found several news items about him.

December 21, 1904 – Would She Be That Selfish?

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.

 

Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
426 Muskingun St. City

230 Kenwood Ave City
December 21, 1904

Mr. Jarrett,
Homer your letter was received, gladly and I shall try to answer every question which you asked of me.
I am very sorry to hear that you are leaving town so suddenly, we shall all miss you very much. You spoke as if someone could influence you in regards to leaving or remaining.

Just for an instant we will say that someone does care for a certain person, and that person wishes to visit his home and mother and friends, whom he has not seen for a long time. Do you think that she would be selfish enough to try to persuade him to remain here, and feeling that his heart is there? I do not think she is that kind of a girl. It is perfectly natural for one to turn homeward at Xmas tide.

Minnie, if she comes at all, will be here about Saturday at noon. Haven’t heard from her for nearly two weeks.

You think that you will not enjoying going to the entertainment alone Monday? I am sorry, for sure. Will you accompany us to Mrs. Rodger’s home and go from there to Church? If you will, be here at 6:15 or 6:00 o’clock if possible, if you are not here at 6:15 we shall go on alone.

Shall be pleased to see you Sunday afternoon. In regards to Xmas present, why anything that you get I shall like it. Do not worry about it for I should be pleased with anything.

Yours Sincerely
Pearl D. Reed