The United States Colored Troops Statue, Washington DC

African American Civil War Memorial, Washington DC
  • Abraham Cleage/Abram Cleag – I have so much new information, waiting to be written up.
  • Charles A. Cleage – I have his pension file and that of his widow, waiting to be written up.
  • George Cleage
  • George Cleage There were two, I have not written up this one yet.
  • Philip Cleage He died of smallpox, but his widow’s pension file is rich in information. Still have to write it up.

All of the men above belonged to the 1st Regiment, United States Colored Heavy Artillery

Organized at Knoxville, Tenn., February 20, 1864. Attached to 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Corps, Dept. of Ohio, to February, 1865. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, District of East Tennessee, Dept. of the Cumberland, to March, 1865. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, District of East Tennessee, to March, 1866.

SERVICE.-Duty at Knoxville, Tenn., till January, 1865. Operations against Wheeler in East Tennessee August 15-25, 1864. Operations in Northern Alabama and East Tennessee January 31-April 24, 1865. Stoneman’s operations from East Tennessee into Southwestern Virginia and Western North Carolina February to April. At Greenville and in District of East Tennessee till March, 1866. Mustered out March 31, 1866.

Meanwhile, in Kentucky, my grandmother Pearl Reed Cleage’s uncle Thomas Allen (formerly Thomas Ray, who later dropped his slave name of “Ray” and took his father’s name of “Allen”), served with the 5h Regiment USCT Calvary.

5th Regiment, United States Colored Cavalry
Overview:
Organized at Camp Nelson, Ky., October 24, 1864. Attached to 1st Division, District of Kentucky, Dept. of Ohio, to February, 1865. Military District of Kentucky and Dept. of Arkansas, to March, 1866.
Service:
Participated in Burbridge’s Raid from Kentucky into Southwestern Virginia September 20-October 17, 1864. Action at Saltsville, Va., October 2. At Lexington, Ky., October 19. Harrodsburg, Ky., October 21. Stoneman’s Raid into Southwestern Virginia December 10-29. Near Marion December 17-18. Capture of Saltsville and destruction of salt works December 20-21. Duty at Ghent, Paducah, LaGrange, Crab Orchard and Camp Nelson till August, 1865, and in the Dept. of Arkansas till March, 1866. Mustered out March 20, 1866.

Regiment lost during service 35 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 1 Officer and 151 Enlisted men by disease. Total 187.

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So much new information waiting to be written up, but to see what I have already done, click on the underlined links above.

For more Sepia Saturday posts, click!

 

 

Joe Turner’s Death Certificate

joeseph-turners-death-certificate-blog

Other posts about my 2X great grandfather, Joseph Turner of Lowndes County, Alabama.

March 10, 1905 – Homer Sends Music and 50 Stamps. Hugh Whistles.

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.

 

Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
9 Walnut St.
Hot Springs, Ark

2730 Kenwood Ave.
Indianapolis, In
March 10, 1905

Dear Homer;

Your letter, stamps and music were received o.k. and I am very grateful to you. Since I wrote to you I’ve learned that the song mentioned is quite old and Hugh seems to have whistled it in a very long time and heard it at the theater. I do not like it a bit less for all that. I think it very sweet and sad and mother likes it too.

I asked you when you were coming back and for answer you sent me 50 stamps. Do you mean to be away until they are used? If I should write each week, why they would last 12 months and one half. Do you mean to remain away that long Homer? In asking you that, I did not imply that you should pay me postage sir.

You spoke of the fire, Homer, well “my” paper said “The exact area burned over is 104 ½ acres” and also, “It is impossible to give a close estimate of the losses or the insurances. Probably a million dollars ($1,000,000) is not too high and may not be high enough. Insurance will not reach 50% of losses.”

The game of “Pit” is played with cards that resemble ordinary playing cards. All of the different grains are mentioned and worth from 35 to 100 points. The players try to corner all of one grain and when they do so they receive to their credit whatever it’s worth. The game has 500 points in all. Very interesting. Think you would like it. I did then.

You asked me whom or who accompanied me to Allen Chapel; well I will inform you “mother and Hugh.”

Have you heard from home and friends lately? How are your mother and brother?

Forgive me Homer and how are you? I forgot to ask. I am very well; and very busy just at present. Mother wanted to go to Benton Harbor this spring and I did not so, I think I’m big girl tho to remain at home. Have I tired you Homer with this stuff? I am sure I have. You must write and tell me all about yourself and mates and O everything. It is almost 11:30 P.M. and I am sleepy so just,

Good night
Pearl

___________________

I looked for the song “Down on The Farm” on youtube, alas, I could not find it. I did find the sheet music, which I gather Homer sent and Pearl would have played on the piano, or the guitar.

Click the link for more about Harry Von Tilzer, the author of this and many popular songs.

March 2, 1905 – Delighted With Stereoscopic Views, a Big Fire and Neglect of MacFadden’s Program

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.

 

Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
9 Walnut St.
Hot Springs, Ark

2730 Kenwood Ave
Indianapolis Ind.
March 2, 1905

Dear Homer

Your paper was received and I thank you for sending it to me. Very glad to hear that your mother is improving so nicely and that you will not be obliged to return home. It seems strange that it all happens while you are away but it seems that way, that when we would most have things do nicely and run smoothly – it most assuredly goes just the contrary.

You asked me if I still followed the advice of Mr. McFadden. Well to speak confidentially I think that I’ve neglected in some things, but the main and most important, I have followed closely as I hope ever to do. I am sorry that you have neglected also.

Our fire, which you mentioned, was not so very bad Homer, only about one half a block. Of course it was bad in a way it burned and smoked for two days. I have forgotten the cause of it, if indeed I ever knew. I was not interested in it, only that through it many poor men would find employment. The building at the corner of Mer(idian) & Wash(ington) the S.W. Cor(ner) is being torn down to make room for a large department store of L.S. Ayres.

O Homer, I almost forgot to tell you that I visited Allen Chapel Sunday Eve. There was an illustrated sermon with stereoscopic views, which was very good. Don’t you know I never tire of them. When I was real little I would be delighted with a series of these pictures and I am almost the same now. There was one set of pictures accompanied by a beautiful song entitled the or I should have said “Down on the Farm” which I thought just lovely. I never heard it before and I think I shall try and get it if I can.

Last night we had some company and someone had brought the game of “Pit”. It derived it’s name from it’s allusions to Wall Street. Really Homer it is great. I really enjoyed it.

I have tried your patience surely I know haven’t I, Homer. O, it takes so much scribbling to say such a little, where as in speaking in only a few minutes we can say so much.

When are you coming home or, I beg your pardon, back to Indianapolis?

Sincerely
Pearl Doris Reed

______________

January 18, 1905 – Shall We Cease Writing?

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.
Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
9 Walnut St.
Hot Springs, Ark

2731 Kenwood Ave
Indianapolis Ind.
January 18, 1905

Mr. Jarrett;

Homer, having just returned from a long walk with Helen, Jim and Ben, I wish to speak with you. I shall pretend that I see you and I can get on nicer or better. Homer I am sorry that our short acquaintance was so very disappointing to you and that I was and am so very contrary and flighty but you will see Homer, that I can’t be otherwise I could not if I tried. Of course I shall not say that I do try – for I should speak untrue. Maybe it is just as well that we did not go any more than we did together.

Listen, you speak of the gifts from you to me. Why, Homer, I would have given them back to you because I did not think myself worthy of them, do you understand? I was and am proud of the books and the parasol and shall always be and love them.

But Homer, listen if you do not believe anything that I say any more, don’t you think that I better cease writing to you? You do not care for me or you would trust me. Do you know that people generally trust those that they truly care for? Do you always expect proofs of things? Do you never think of trusting anybody, even those you profess to care for? Homer, this being the case I think we should cease to correspond, don’t you? You do and would not believe anything I should say and so it would be all of no avail.

Mother is getting on nicely and sends her best regards to you and advises you to be a good boy.

Minnie and family are quite well. They send love and best wishes to you. The children often speak of you to me.

Love from all to you.

Glad you heard from your mother and that she is well.

Our church is carrying on revival now and I think I shall attend tomorrow night.

Homer, Good By
Yours Sincerely,
Pearl D. Reed

________________

In January of 1905, Minnie Mullins and her four children were visiting Indianapolis from Benton Harbor, Michigan. Minnie was 27 years old. She was the mother of four children – Helen, Jim, Ben and Arthur.

January 15, 1905 – Mother Better and Homer Describes Mountains

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.

 

Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
9 Walnut St.
Hot Springs, Ark

2730 Kenwood Ave.
Indianapolis, Ind
January 15, 1905

Dear Homer,

Your letter was received with delight. Was so glad to hear from you. Do you believe it? Of course you don’t. You never believed a thing I told you, do you, friend? Forgive me Homer, I did not mean to annoy you, and I forget that this year I was not to quarrel, not to worry anyone, if I could possibly avoid it.

Your scenic description was splendid, I could almost picture myself there among the mountains. So glad to hear that you have a church so very near you and that you are so pleased with your surroundings.

Mother is much better now. She sends her love to you. Do you believe it? Mr. Mullins and family are quite well. She sends her best regard to you. There is nothing of unusual happening that I know of Homer, to tell you of now so I shall say good-night.

Please write soon
Yours sincerely
Pearl D. Reed.

_________

Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas. Wikipedia Commons

January 2, 1905 – Mother Ill and Homer In Hot Springs, Arkansas

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.
Pearl Reed

Mr. Homer Jarrett
#9 Walnut St.
Hot Springs, Ark.

2730 Kenwood Ave
Ind, Ind.
Jan. 2nd/05

Mr. Jarrett;
Dear Homer,

Your letter was gladly received today.

I was very disappointed to find that the other one was for your mother instead of me. I would have sent it on to her but you never cared to tell me her address, but I shall send it as I send this to you. I wonder if she would be angry if she knew to whom it had been sent?

Homer you have no idea how much you are missed, of course you are not out very often, but, we knew that you were here.

Sorry you did not see Minnie and family they send their love to you. Did you see Wilson before you left? I heard that he was looking for you, but I did not see him myself.

Mother is very ill with tonsillitis. She is sorry that you left without telling her goodbye, and sends her love and best wishes to you.

I am growing sleepy Homer and I shall cease for this time. It is just 12:30 o’clock. All are asleep but me and mother.

O, Homer tell me all that happens will you? Remember nothing will be too trivial, for I shall be interested in all that you do and everything that happens to you.

Write very very soon.
Yours ever sincerely,
Pearl D. Reed

__________________

Wilson Mullins was Mr. James Mullins younger brother. He was a chef and owned a cafe for several years. I found several news items about him.

December 21, 1904 – Would She Be That Selfish?

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.

 

Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
426 Muskingun St. City

230 Kenwood Ave City
December 21, 1904

Mr. Jarrett,
Homer your letter was received, gladly and I shall try to answer every question which you asked of me.
I am very sorry to hear that you are leaving town so suddenly, we shall all miss you very much. You spoke as if someone could influence you in regards to leaving or remaining.

Just for an instant we will say that someone does care for a certain person, and that person wishes to visit his home and mother and friends, whom he has not seen for a long time. Do you think that she would be selfish enough to try to persuade him to remain here, and feeling that his heart is there? I do not think she is that kind of a girl. It is perfectly natural for one to turn homeward at Xmas tide.

Minnie, if she comes at all, will be here about Saturday at noon. Haven’t heard from her for nearly two weeks.

You think that you will not enjoying going to the entertainment alone Monday? I am sorry, for sure. Will you accompany us to Mrs. Rodger’s home and go from there to Church? If you will, be here at 6:15 or 6:00 o’clock if possible, if you are not here at 6:15 we shall go on alone.

Shall be pleased to see you Sunday afternoon. In regards to Xmas present, why anything that you get I shall like it. Do not worry about it for I should be pleased with anything.

Yours Sincerely
Pearl D. Reed

December 1, 1904 – Tired of Sarcasm and Baby Arthur Walks!

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.
Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
426 Muskingun St. City

230 Kenwood Ave.
December 1, 1904

 

Mr. Jarrett;

Homer your sarcastic letter was received. I am glad the mistake was mine and that my poor letters give you something to laugh and make fun of. Will you please forget that errand of Mercy?

It is too bad that you have to work on Sundays. Do you mind it? If you do, I sympathize with you. Do you like this place better than the other?

If nothing happens to prevent it, I shall visit my church Sunday eve. We had a letter from Minnie yesterday. They are all well and send their love to you. The baby Arthur walks now.

I shall cease writing now for it is time to prepare supper.

Hoping to see you Sunday Eve, I remain

Yours Sincerely,
Pearl D. Reed

_______________

 

Arthur Mullins records say he was born September 6, 1904, 1905 or even 1901(marriage record), however if he’s walking in December of 1904, it’s unlikely he was born 3 months earlier or in the next year. His three older siblings were born in 1899, 1900 and 1901. His next sibling was born in 1906. Which just goes to show, records can be wrong.

November 11, 1904 – Homer Advised Not to Visit

Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries. Click to enlarge.
Pearl Reed

Homer Jarrett
426 Muskingun St. City

2730 Kenwood Ave.
November 11, 1904

 

 

Mr. Jarrett,
Dear friend,
your letter was received, of course and I was a little disappointed to learn that you would be unable to visit us for so long, but if McFadden advises it I am sure it is for the best. I shall expect to see a wonderful change in you, whenever we do meet, so much so that I shall feel like an insignificant, little minx beside you. I should so like to see you just as near perfection as is possible, Homer, truly.

We wanted you with us Thanksgiving, but I suppose that is impossible also. I think that Minnie will be home Xmas and we should like to have you out then if you could come. You want news but I know very little just now. It is near nine o’clock and I am going to cease worrying you, for I know that you are tired of this stuff, are you not?

Listen! I do not wish to interfere with your Culture Laws, Homer, so if you think it best, I shall not expect an answer from this, for a long time. I am following the instructions in the book which you sent but I do not expect to be perfect for it is not in me.

Sincerely
Pearl

__________________

To read all of MacFadden’s book, click this link ->Physical Culture