Winter 1966 knitting

Here I am starting my one and only knitting project.  When it was done the edges curled up.  It was light blue, very long and wrapped around my head and face during the cold Detroit winters.  I added fringe to the ends and wore it all through college.  I’m wearing it below in 1969.  To see other SepiaSaturday offerings  click HERE.

Winter Springfield, Mass – 1949

I’m in the front, my mother is propping up my sister Pearl.  My father took the photo in our yard.  He was the pastor of St. John’s Congregational Church in Springfield Massachusetts and we lived in the parsonage/community house right next to the church.  We moved to my parents hometown, Detroit, when I was four where we still had plenty of snow.

These photographs are in a crumpling album that my father put together back in the 1940’s.  He wrote comments on all the photographs. I have to photograph or scan them before they disappear.

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In Which I Hit The Google Photo Jackpot

Willie holding grandson Conrad, daughter Naomi looking on.
Tulane photographs found online yesterday.

I worked all day yesterday pulling together records and information to write about why Aunt Willie might have been sitting so far from her husband, Uncle Victor, in my last weeks photo.  I was going to use the photo on the left side which was taken on the same porch.  I was going to talk about her relative’s memories of her as sad and obessesed with her daughter and her well being.  About how her husband’s well known unfaithfulness, the death of two of her three children within three years of each other, the son her husband fathered earlier in the same year they were married and how the son, Victor Julius Tulane, and his mother lived right down the street from them in 1900.

Then I got interested in Victor Tulane’s early history, his mother who was a servant and probably former slave of Louis Tulane in Elmore County Alabama and his son, Horatio Tulane, who was twenty years her senior and Victor’s father.  I was going to mention that the Tulane family recognized the relationship.  How they were a merchant family and that after Victor packed his bags at age twleve and walked the 14 miles from Wetumpka to Montgomery, he became a very successful merchant too.

I was going to mention that Victor’s son, Victor Julius came to live with the family when he was in his teens and was sent to school in Michigan where he became a chemist.  But at that point I decided to google Victor  J. Tulane and see if I could find a picture of him because I did not have one.  I like to have pictures.  I had heard he looked very like Naomi, his half sister, but he had blue, blue eyes.  I found two photographs of him, both from Crisis magazine.  Then I thought I would look for his father.  I found a group photograph with him in the Alabama Archives.  I was on a roll, why not try to find a picture of Naomi’s husband, Ubert Conrad Vincent who was a well known black doctor in New York during the 1920’s.  He pioneered a medical procedure that is known as the Vincent procedure.  Here is where I hit the jackpot.  I found an 8 page article from the Journal of the National Medical Association, 1975.  That gave an in depth look at his whole medical career with 5 photographs, including one of him and his wife Naomi soon after their marriage.  Naomi and Ubert’s daughter told me that they met at a cast party for the first black Broadway musical  at the home of Noble Sissle so I looked for a cast photo.  Found.  Last, I looked for a photo of their residence on Striver’s Row in Harlem.  Still there and lookin’ good.

Now I will identify the photographs in the collage above, starting from the bottom left.
Bottom row:
1.  The Crisis Jun-Jul 1959.  “First Church – Dr. Victor J Tulane (L), chairman of the trustee board of the John Wesley AME Zion church, Washington, D.C., presents chairman Theodore Taylor of the Washington branch a $100 check toward his church’s NAACP life memership. …”
2.  “Dr. Vincent in the door of his Sanatorium”.
3.  Noble Sissle with chorus girls from the musical “Shuffle Along”.
4.  “Dr. Vincent (right at table) assisting Dr. Keyes (?) in an operation at Bellevue.” (Journal of the National Medical Association January 1975)

Middle row:
1.  The Crisis Oct 1933 ” Awards  To Dr. Victor J. Tulane of the University of Michigan, election to Sigma, Xi, honorary science fraternity.  Mr. Tulane was awarded the degree of Doctor of Philosophy by the University of Michigan in June.”
2. A blow up of Victor Hugh Tulane’s head from the group photo above.
3. Skipping over to the group shot on the far right of that row – from the Journal – “Dr. Vincent (right) with (from left) Dr. Marshall Ross, Hon Adam Clayton Powell, Jr, and Mayor McKee.”

Top row:
1.Tuskegee College Board of Directors.  Front row center is Booker T. Washington.  Back row far right is Victor H. Tulane (Willie’s husband.  Naomi’s father)
2.  From the Journal “Dr. and Mrs. Vincent shortly after their marriage.”
3.  From google street view, the place the Vincents called home.

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Wordless Wednesday (mostly) – Gathering at my Cleage grandparents 1955

This isn’t Thanksgiving.  I don’t see a turkey.  Most of the cousins are missing. But it’s the only family dinner I could find that wasn’t in the summer for this side of the family.  My grandmother at the end of the table in photo one and my grandfather at the end in the other.  My father chewing next to my grandfather.

Victor and Willie Lee Tulane and children

Victor and Willie Lee (Allen) Tulane are buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Montgomery, Alabama.  Two of their children who died in early childhood are buried next to them.  My daughter Ife and I visited the cemetery in 2009.  It was on a Sunday and we didn’t expect anyone would be there to help us find the graves but the sexton was there and he was very helpful.  We also found Dock and Eliza (Williams) Allen are also buried there, in the older part of the cemetery.  One day I will post those photos and tell the whole story.

Naomi Tulane’s Engagement Photograph 1920

Naomi Tulane Vincent.  Her engagement photograph. There is a matching one of her husband Ubert but, unfortunately, I do not have one.  Naomi was the daughter of Victor and Willie (Allen) Tulane.  She was married in Montgomery, Alabama in 1920 and then moved to New York as the wife of a society doctor.  For more Sepia Saturday offerings.