Eliza’s Children Move North

Migration routes of Eliza’s children.
Mary Allen McCall

Eliza’s oldest daughter Mary Allen was born in 1856 in Dallas County, Alabama. She married Edward McCall and they had six children together. One died in infancy.

In 1920, when Mary McCall was 63, her husband died. Later that year her oldest son, James Edward McCall and his family, migrated to Detroit. Mary McCall moved with them. She died there in 1937.

Mary McCall’s surviving children all left Montgomery and moved north.

  1. James Edward McCall migrated to Detroit in 1920.
  2. Anna Belle McCall Martin moved several times, arriving in Lima, Ohio in 1922. She moved to Detroit in 1930 and lived there for many years before moving to California.
  3. Leon Roscoe McCall migrated to Detroit in 1920 with his family. They later moved to Chicago, IL.
  4. William McCall died as an infant.
  5. Alma Otilla McCall Howard lived in Holly Springs Mississippi before the family migrated to Chicago by 1930.
  6. Jeanette McCall McEwen was in Chicago by 1920.

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Ransom Allen

Ransom Allen was born in 1860 Dallas County AL. He migrated to Chicago with his wife by 1920.

His only child John Wesley Allen was in Chicago by June 5, 1917.

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Dock Allen Jr was born in 1862. He died by drowning in 1891 in Montgomery.

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"Jennie and Lizzie"
Jennie Virginia Allen Turner

Jennie Virginia Allen Turner was born in 1866 Montgomery. Her first husband Howard Turner died in 1890. She separated from her second husband Edward Wright before 1910. She migrated to Detroit with her younger daughters in 1922 to join her oldest daughter, (my grandmother) after she married and moved there in 1919.

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Anna Allen

Anna Allen was born Montgomery 1869. She left Montgomery for Chicago before 1900.  She passed for white and died there after 1945.

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"Willie Lee and Naomi Vincent"
Willie Lee Allen Tulane and daughter Naomi. Montgomery, Alabama about 1910.

Willie Lee Allen Tulane was born in 1873 in Montgomery. Her husband, Victor Tulane, died in 1931 in Montgomery. She remained there until 1958. Several months before she died, she moved to New York City to live with her only surviving child, Naomi Tulane Vincent who had moved to New York in 1920 after marrying Ubert Vincent.

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Abbie Allen Brown

Abbie Allen Brown was born in 1876 in Montgomery. She married Edward Brown and they were divorced before 1900.

She moved to Detroit in 1946 and lived with her niece, Fannie Turner Graham and her family. She died there in 1966.

Both of her sons moved to New York. The oldest, Earl Brown, lived in New York by 1917. The other, Alphonso Brown was in New York by 1925.

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Beulah Allen Pope

Beulah Allen Pope was born in 1879 in Montgomery. She married Robert Pope. He died in 1941, in Montgomery. By 1948 She had moved to Milwaukee, WI to live with her oldest son, Charles Lee Pope. She died there in 1962. In addition to her son Charles, her daughter Annie Lee also lived in Milwaukee. Her youngest son Robert and his family lived in Chicago by 1942.

Charles Lee Pope – Moved to Milwaukee, Wisconsin by 1926.
Annie Lee Pope Gilmer married and was in Milwaukee by 1922.
Robert Pope and family were in Chicago by 1942.

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They left in this order:

Anna moved to Chicago alone between 1880 and 1900.

Ransom moved to Chicago with his wife, son and daughter-in-law before 1920.

Mary and her oldest son James Edward McCall moved to Detroit in 1920.

My great grandmother Jennie joined her oldest daughter, my grandmother, Fannie in Detroit in 1922.

Abbie moved to Detroit in 1946 to stay with her niece, my grandmother Fannie.

Beulah moved to Milwaukee, WI about 1947, to live with her oldest son Charles, who never married.

Willie Lee moved to New York to live with her daughter several months before her death in 1958, leaving no more of Eliza’s children or grandchildren in Montgomery.

8 thoughts on “Eliza’s Children Move North

    1. I have quite a bit on my maternal grandparents and their friends written up. I have information on my paternal side but I need to write it up.

  1. I always look forward to your next awesome piece of family history. I love how you’re able to trace and document so much of your family’s migration from the south! Thank you for sharing.

    1. I am lucky that my parents generation talked about their aunts, uncles and cousins so much that I felt I knew them. And then everybody saved lots of stuff. And also there are the cousins who share the story of their branch.

    1. They were part of the Great Migration of over six million black people out of the South between 1916 and 1970. Most of my grandparents friends also left Montgomery during that time around WW1.

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