We Read, We Write, We Print and We Publish.

Photos include 2 grandparents, both parents, several aunts and uncles, my husband, me, all 6 of my children, all 9 of my grandchildren, plus  some spouses, my sister and some cousins.  Click on the picture to enlarge.

I come from a family of readers. When I was growing up there were magazines, newspapers, fiction, encyclopedias, cookbooks, comic books, poetry books, the Bible, children’s books, adult books, how-to books, instruction manuals, old books and new books. We read paperback and hardcover books.  Now we read on Kindles, Nooks, computers and our cell phones.  We write full length books and chapbooks, for each other and for the world – fiction, poetry, speeches, plays, journals and diaries.  We publish newspapers, newsletters and blogs.  We give books as gifts and receive them. We buy them and we borrow them from the library and from each other.

What am I reading these days? When I am on the computer I read for information, usually related to a blog post I’m working on these days about a family related topic. And I read other people’s blogs. Off of the computer, I am reading some Australian fiction that Pauline and her friends recommended for me. You can find the list on her website Family History Across the Seas.  I’ve also started reading genealogy related mystery novels on my Kindle.

Here are some reading related posts I’ve done in the past – I Met My Husband in the Library, Home Library 1931,   Getting An Education, The Illustrated News, Poems by James Edward McCall, Henry Cleage and the Press, Proof Positive – A Short Story by Henry Cleage,

To see the books my sister, Pearl Cleage has written go to Amazon -Pearl Cleage.  To see books my father, Albert B. Cleage Jr has written go to Amazon here.

This post was written as part of the Carnival of Genealogy (COG) #118 sponsored by  Jasia at CreativeGene .

 

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18 Responses to We Read, We Write, We Print and We Publish.

  1. It is so beautiful that your family shares this joy of reading and writing. You cannot deny that it is a part of your DNA! Great post.

    • Kristin says:

      It must be. And there has been such a supportive atmosphere with people doing things connected to the written word. Some families sing or do sports. My family reads and writes and talks.

  2. Carol says:

    First, your collage is fantastic! I cannot stop looking at it. I am just so impressed at all those photos of you all reading. Wonderful!

    And, for the rest, well, color me impressed!

  3. Sheryl says:

    I also love the collages that you’ve done recently–and the header photo that is related to the post is great.

    As to what I’ve been reading–

    As a result of my family history research, I’ve discovered Edith Wharton and am currently reading The House of Mirth. I’m not sure whether or not I like it, but Wharton’s books always make me think.

    • Kristin says:

      I don’t think I read anything by Edith Wharton, although I recognize the name. Let me know what you think when you are done. I recently read “A Town Like Alice” by Nevil Shute. That is one of the books from the Australia list and I did enjoy it, although it was written in the era when some racism entered in just as a natural part of the life of the main character. I am getting ready to read “In the Territory of Lies” by Peg Robarchek, Lois Stickell. It is a genealogy mystery.
      I’m glad you like my collages. I enjoy doing them.

  4. Pauleen says:

    Love the collage again, but love the atmosphere of readers everywhere. It made me feel “at home”. Hope your Aussie reading list is going okay. I agree that A Town like Alice is very much situated in its era (not entirely disappeared in rural Australia, in particular)… an almost “casual” racism, which is not to undermine its effect on those involved. I just re-read it after the blog post -many, many years since I’d done so and was struck by how much Australia’s vernacular language has been changed, and might be said to be Americanised or globalised. I miss some of the special/unique Aussie expression, didn’t identify with others, and don’t miss the racism at all. I found too that having lived in the tropics for over 25 years so much of the weather was familiar, and to a lesser extent, the bush. Ironically Alice Springs is very much a racist town now where there are a LOT of problems…not a place another town would aspire to.

  5. Kristin says:

    I’m sorry to hear about Alice. I could tell the heroine was forward thinking and before her time by bringing a segregated area into her ice cream store as opposed to just banning people altogether. “Casual” is a good word for it. Racism can be so ingrained in the system of living that it just “is”. In those cases it’s not that people make a choice, they just do what’s been done without thinking about it or imagining that it could be different. After I finish the book I’m reading now I will choose another Australian book to read.

    • Oh yes… where would we be without books? As a young mum, the only way I got through the boredom of endless housework was with a book tucked under my arm. I’d make little promises to myself that I could read another chapter after a certain chore had been finished.
      No wonder my children grew up to be avid consumers of the written word… and now the grandchildren :-)
      Thanks for a great post. Cheers.

      • Kristin says:

        I’m afraid that half the time I didn’t even make myself finish the chore before I would read. Nursing the baby was always a good time for reading.

  6. Pauleen says:

    I’m with Kristin on this Catherine! Books vs chores is a no-contest choice.

  7. Jasia says:

    Well, you could definitely write the book on family reading, Kristin, and illustrate it with your photos as well! I’m very impressed with all the readers and writers in your family. And if I’m being honest (and I am ;-) I’m a bit envious too. I can only imagine what it must be like to be among family members who value and enjoy reading for the shear joy of it. Thanks so much for sharing and contributing to the COG!

    • Kristin says:

      Thank you for giving me this theme to work with. Who knew I had so many photographs of my family members (and me) reading?

  8. J.M. says:

    Great post! And indeed a very lovely collage.

  9. Love the collage, how did you do it? Great post altogether!

    • Kristin says:

      Dawn, scanned all the photos I could find of us reading and then put them together using photoshop. I’m glad you liked it.

  10. Joan says:

    Kristin, your post on reading will keep me busy for days! So glad I stopped by and thereby received a feast of reading. Thanks.

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