Pension File #2- Marriage

Unknown couple. From: Post-Civil War Life For African Americans Focus Of Amistad, Lyman Allyn Exhibits

This is the third post about the life of Susan Richardson Abbott. You can read earlier parts of Susan Abbott’s story at these links.:

Susan Richardson Abbott – Part 1 – 1829-1866
Susan Richardson Abbott – Part 2 – 1867-1909
Susan Abbott’s Depostion – Pension File Part 1

In 1890 Susan Richardson Abbott received a widow’s pension because of her husband Randolph Abbott’s service with the United States Colored Troops during the United States Civil War.

Today there are two statements made concerning her marriage to the soldier, Randolph Abbott. The first are by two men who were also enslaved on Col. Hazzard’s plantation before Freedom. The second were made by the widow and daughter of a neighbor of Hazzard, Captain Stevens. Captain Stevens had the plantation next to Hazzard.

Click on any of the images to enlarge them.

GENERAL AFFIDAVIT

State of Georgia, County of Glynn, SS:

In the matter of Pension of Susan Abbott

On this 18th day of May, A. D. 1894, personally appeared before me, a clerk County Court, in and for the aforesaid County, duly authorized to administer oats, Wesley Lee aged 70 years, a resident of St. Simons Island, in the County of Glynn, and state of Georgia, whose Post Office is St. Simons Island Ga, and Charles Ryals (about), aged 75 years, a resident of St. Simons Island, in the County of Glynn and State of Georgia, whose Post Office address is St. Simons Island, well know to be reputable and entitled to credit, and who, being duly sworn, declared in relation to aforesaid case, as follows;

(Affiants would state how they gained a knowledge of the facts to which they testify)

We lived on the same plantation with Randolph and Susan Abbott. We remember their marriage by white Episcopal minister (Mr. Brown) We moved back to the old home after the war.  Sue never married again. Randolph and Sue was born and raised on West Point Plantation and owned by Col Hazzard.

Before the war Susan was a house servant, Randolph a farm hand. After the war, he was a farmer. Randolph was in bad health after he left the army until time of death, which took place Feb. 1875. We were with him when he was sick and at his death and attended his funeral. Randolph was tall and well made not quite black.

They had five children. Betsy, Louis, Brista, Joe Thomas.

Betsey and Louis died some years since.

Cannot give age of children.

And we further declare that we have no interest in said case, and that we are not concerned in its prosecution.

(If Affiants sign by mark, two witnesses who can write sign here)
A. J. Corvatt
A E Eve

(Affiants)
Wesly Lee his X mark
Charles Ryals his X mark

GENERAL AFFIDAVIT

State of Georgia, County of Glynn SS:

In the matter of Pension of Susan Abbott

On this 18th day of May A. D. 1894 personally appeared before me, clerk of the Common Court in and for the aforesaid County, duly authorized to administer oaths, Annie F Arnold aged 50 years a resident of St. Simons Island in the County of Glynn, and state of Georgia whose Post Office address is St. Simons Island GA, and Sarah D. Stevens, aged 45 years, a resident of St. Simons Island, in the County of Glynn and State of Georgia, whose Post Office address is St. Simons Island Georgia, well known to be reputable and entitled to credit, and who, being duly sworn, declared in relation to aforesaid case, as follows:

(affiants should state how they gained a knowledge of the facts to which they testify)

Randolph and Susan Abbott were married by an Episcopal minister Rev Brown about the year 1852. (Am not certain about dates) The church books having been destroyed by fire it is impossible to get the certificate of marriage.

Their first child Betsy was born the following year and christened by same minister. Living on the next plantation and visiting their owners (Col Hazzard and family) we knew them well. After the war they returned to their old home and we saw them constantly.  Susan did not marry after her husband’s death. They were good respectable people. Their P. O. address was Fredrica Ga at the time of their marriage. After the war ended they returned to their former home and same P .O. address until Randolph’s death, which happened, (I think) Feb 1875.

And we further declare that we have no interest in said case, and that we are not concerned in its prosecution

(If Affiants sign by mark, two witnesses who can write sign here)
A J Corvatt
A. E. Eve

(signature of Affiants)
Annie F. Arnold
Sarah D Stevens

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