Tag Archives: Phillip Cleage

“I remember their having one child”

Deposition E

David Bridges was literate and signed his name on his deposition.

14 June 1890
David Bridges

I am 41 years old, a farmer by trade and my post office address is Market House (stall 13.) Chattanooga, Tenn.

I have known the claimant ever since I was a small boy. I lived in Athens near her from the time I was a small boy until during the war. I left there in 1862 and went in the army in 1863. I was not an enlisted man, that is, I was taken prisoner before I was mustered in. I have seen the claimant since the war, but it has been some time ago.

When I knew her in Athens she was what I suppose you would call married, in those times we had no license. She was living with a man as his wife. The man she was living with was Philip Cleage. I knew him well. I used to go out very often to see them. I don’t know how long they had been living together, but they were living home when I went off to go in the army. They had one or two children, I disremember which, there was one certain. I could not tell whether the child lived. I remember their having one child, the last time I went to the farm the child was a small child, a baby in its mothers arms. I don’t know whether Philip worked on the farm, or what he did do. I do not know what Katie did, I did not live with them, I was only there back and forth Sundays and nights. They lived in a cabin back of the Cleage mansion. I saw Philip after he went in the army, at Knoxville. I saw the claimant during the time I was in Knoxville. She was with Philip and staid in the camp with him and was known as his wife. My brother married in the Cleage family and his wife came to Knoxville while I was there. My brother is named George Sherman and he lives in Athens, Tenn. He did not belong to the same regiment the claimants husband did. My brother’s wife who was at Knoxville is not living. I am positive that Philip Cleage and the claimant lived together as husband and wife before and at the time of the war and after he went in the service. I do not know of my own knowledge but after I came out of prison, I did not get home until 1867 and I was then told that Philip was dead. I have seen and heard of the claimant, but I have never visited her any since the war.

I have never heard that she had remarried since Philip ‘s death. The only one of Philips brothers living that I know of is Charles, at Athens, Tenn. Yes, he was living in the Cleage place during and before the war. I am not related. I have no interest in the world in this claim. Katie has never mentioned the matter to me, I never knew that she was looking for, or expecting a pension.

I have fully understood all your questions and my answers have been correctly recorded

By claimants Atty.:  Are you certain about seeing the child?

David Bridges: I am. I saw the child and supposed it was his child and had reason to suppose it was. I may be mistaken about it’s being her child.

14 June 1890

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David Bridges was born into slavery about 1844. He married twice. The first time to Nancy Loucey. They had at least four children together. In the 1870 census, David could read but not write. By the 1880 census he could read and write. I do not know if he attended school or if his children taught him as they learned. I was impressed with his handwriting in signing his signature.

David worked as a laborer in Athens, TN for some years and then about 1881, the family moved to Chattanooga where he worked at Hoyt’s Tannery. In 1887, Nancy Bridges died in Chattanooga. She was 45. The cause of death was given as edema. Her remains were returned to Athens and buried there.

In 1894, fifty year old David married 32 year old Charity Martin. They returned to Athens where they had three children together. David worked as a laborer. He died sometime between the 1900 and the 1910 census. I have been unable to find a death record for him and unable to find the family in the 1920 census. However, I know he died before 1910 because Charity listed herself as a widow. And he doesn’t appear anywhere else.

Charity worked as a cook. She suffered from tuberculous for two years before dying on October 2, 1921. Her son David Bridges was the informant on her death certificate. He did not know her parents names.

“I don’t remember…”

Deposition D

13 Jun 1890
Mrs. T. A. Cleage Sr

Penelope Van Dyke Cleage in her youth

I am 54 years of age, the wife of Thomas A. Cleage and my post office address is No. 111 Gilmer St. Chattanooga, Tenn.

I know the claimant Katie Cleage, she was a seamstress in my husband’s mother’s family. I knew Philip Cleage that is, I remember there was such a man on the place. I have no recollection that Katie and Philip were married or that they lived together as husband and wife.

I do not know as to whether or not Katie had any children. I don’t remember that she ever did any work for me. I lived in Athens Tenn. and Katie lived about three miles out of town on the farm with my husband’s father. If Katie were married to Philip, I think I would have known it. I do not remember when the servants left – though it was during the war. I have not had any knowledge relating to the claimant since the war. I have no interest in this claim for a pension. My answers have been correctly recorded.

Mrs. T. A. Cleage

13 day of June 1890

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“Chattanooga Daily Gazette” pg. 3 August 6, 1865

Penelope Van Dyke Cleage was born in 1836 to the wealthy family of Judge Thomas Nixon Van Dyke and his wife Elizabeth Anne Deadrick in McMinn County, outside of Athens. She married Thomas A. Cleage in 1856. Thomas Alexander Cleage was the oldest son of the slave holders Alexander and Jemima Cleage.

Penelope gave birth to nine children and six were surviving in 1900. All were born in Tennessee except daughter Susan, who was born in November 1865 in Adams County, Illinois. How did she come to be in Illinois at that time?

Thomas A. Cleage was involved in removing the assets of the Athens Branch of the State Bank of Tennessee to Georgia during the Civil War. Katie will mention it in her next deposition. Later Thomas, who was a cashier at the bank and other officials, were accused of misappropriating funds for themselves. There was a point when Thomas was arrested and said he knew where the gold was and if they released him, he would go get it and return it. Instead, he went to Illinois, apparently along with his family and Susan was born while they were there. eventually it was worked out without prison and Cleage returned to Tennessee to live in Chattanooga. I gleaned this Information from various newspapers on newspapers.com.

Thomas A. Cleage was 67 when he died of cancer of the stomach in 1900. Penelope died of a stroke in Athens in 1907. She was 72. Her body was returned to Chattanooga and both are buried in Forest Hill Cemetery there.

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Posts in this series so far:
Katie & Philip Cleage
“Until I Was Obliged to Leave” – Katie Cleage
“My husband purchased her when quite a child…” – Jemima Cleage
“I stood aloof and they took him away” – James Royal
“Even then she followed him” – Isaac Charlton 
“I had well nigh despaired of the case”  
“I have had two children…”
“He was a slave of Alex Cleage”
“…5 months before he was taken”
“She had not married since”
“We owned a hundred slaves”
Index to Special Examiner’s Report
Claimant’s Statement
“My mother’s name was Hulda Hurst”
“I remember the claimant as a former slave of my father’s”

I found the information for this post on Ancestry.com, on FamilySearch, on Newspapers.com and on the free site Chattanooga Newspapers

“I remember the claimant as a former slave of my fathers”

Deposition C

John H. Cleage
Chattanooga, Tennessee
13 June 1890

I am 43 years of age, a merchant and my post office is No. 17 Market Square, Chattanooga, Tenn.

I remember the claimant as a former slave of my fathers. I was living home during the late war. The claimant was a house servant, a seamstress I think. She was not married during that time, if she married it was after she left us, I do not know what became of her. I knew Philip Cleage, he was a slave belonging to my father. Philip was one of the farm hands. I didn’t know that he was especially a coachman. Katie and Philip did not live together as man and wife, no doubt they were together some, but they did not live together.

I think it was in 1863 that Katie left us, it was about the time Longstreet went through. Philip left about the same time. I do not know that Katie had any children before she left my father’s, she certainly had none living. I think I would know it if my father married Katie and Philip, under the old slave laws. I do not know how old Katie was but she is older than I am. Philip was older than Katie. I do not remember her and Philip living in the cabin back of our house, if she did I do not remember it.

I think she did have one or two children but they did not live. Whose they were, I do not know. They might have been Philip’s, I could not say as to that. I have no knowledge relating to her since she left our house during the war, until the last few years I have seen her in Chattanooga.

I have no interest in this claim for a pension. I have fully understood all your questions and my answers have been correctly rendered.

J. H. Cleage

13 June 1890

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A bit about Forest Hill Academy. Click to enlarge

John Henry Cleage was the 7th of the ten children of Alexander and Jemima (Hurst) Cleage. John Henry Cleage and Katie Cleage were both born in 1846 in McMinn County, TN. Although John thought Katie was older than he was and Katie thought that John was younger than she was, they were actually the same age. When the Cleages bought Katie from John’s uncle Lewis Hurst, at age 13 to act as household seamstress, John was also 13. He attended school, probably Forest Hill Academy in Athens. In 1869 and 1870 John attended Washington college in Virginia.

In 1875, 28 year old John H. Cleage married Elizabeth Tipton Bradford. They had four children that survived to adulthood. Over the years John worked as a clerk at Tankesley grocery store and then as manager of Chattanooga Installment Furniture House.

Click to enlarge

John’s wife gave birth to their last child in June of 1891. In August of the same year she died of tuberculosis. John died in 1929 at the age of 82 in Mobile, Alabama. His body was brought back to Chattanooga and buried with his wife in Citizen’s Cemetery.

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Posts in this series so far:
Katie & Philip Cleage
“Until I Was Obliged to Leave” – Katie Cleage
“My husband purchased her when quite a child…” – Jemima Cleage
“I stood aloof and they took him away” – James Royal
“Even then she followed him” – Isaac Charlton 
“I had well nigh despaired of the case”  
“I have had two children…”
“He was a slave of Alex Cleage”
“…5 months before he was taken”
“She had not married since”
“We owned a hundred slaves”
Index to Special Examiner’s Report
Claimant’s Statement
“My mother’s name was Hulda Hurst”

“My mother’s name was Huldah Hurst”

Claimant’s statement

Katie Cleage
6 June 1890

I will be 42 years of age this coming July, I am a washer and ironer and my post office address is No. 519 Cedar Street, Chattanooga Tennessee.

I married Philip Cleage after the war commenced and before he went into the army. I really don’t know how long before he went in the army it was that we were married, but we had two children before he enlisted My mistress Jemima Cleage whipped me for going with Philip. I was her seamstress and Philip was the coachman. No, my mistress did not whip me after I was married to him.  I think she knew I was married to Philip because master scolded and knocked around about it and said I should not marry an outsider, that there was plenty of home boys and I should marry one of them.

After I was married to Philip, I slept out in a cabin near the house with Philip. She, my mistress, took care of us when I was sick. I slept in the house before I was married to Philip. My mistress furnished us with a bed. I had the two children there before he went in the army. My old mistress is living but master is dead. I have talked with her about my marriage to Philip, but she was sick the day I saw her and she is quite old and she said she could not remember.

Old Mr. Alexander Cleage and Jemima had four children, but they were small and going to school when I lived on the place with Philip. Sam is dead, I don’t know whether John remembers or not, but Will and Kate were too small and they do not remember.

Yes, I know my mother. She is not living. Yes sir, I know Philips mother. My mother’s name was Huldah Hurst. Philips mother was named Julia Ann Cleage. John Cleage lives here in Chattanooga, Tennessee. My husband had brothers Charles and Lewis and a sister Patsy Cleage. Lewis is dead, has been dead twelve years. Charles and Patsy lives at Athens, Tennessee. David Cleage was my old masters brother, he is dead. I saw my husband o??? and lived with him as his wife while he was in the service.

 After he died I hired out to work for Gen. Grosvenor and worked for him nearly two years. He is now in congress.  Then I went with Col. Sheridan to August Ga. And remained about five months, then came back to Chattanooga, Tenn. I worked at the Crutchfield House, Chattanooga Tenn., since burned down. I worked for Mrs. ______Bishop, she went to Knoxville. I stayed with her about one month. I worked in a Steam Laundry five or six months, then in a restaurant one year. The man I worked for in the laundry is gone. I don’t know where. The man I worked for in the restaurant is dead. I have worked in a tailor shop and millinery shop and at many other places, only a short time in each place. I worked for a Mrs. Williams three years.

I have been working at washing and ironing for myself for five or six years. I have lived where I worked and did not have any home of my own. Since I have been working for myself I have a house of my own. I live all alone. I have a niece with me and a half grown young man for the last three or four months. I have not had but two children since Philips died. They are both living. Yes sir they live with me. The boy is seven years old and my girl is five years old. Their father is living. He is married now, he was not married then. Yes sir, the same man is the father of both children. I did not live with him at all. I have never lived with any man as my husband since Philip died.

 Addie Sherman was one of the house girls in the Cleage family when I was married to Philip. The last I knew of her she was at Athens, Tenn. There were no other house servants. There was a Thomas Cleage who was always with Philip, but I do not know whether he is living at Athens or not, I have not known anything about him since the war.

            Mrs. _______Colburn, living on 6th Street between Poplar and Cedar has known us ever since the war. I was living where I now live when I had my children. I did not have any doctor. I was by myself. I did not have a midwife. Edmonia Charlton living on East End Ave, foot of Harrison St. has known me for fifteen years. I have always worked alone by myself and I have not had any appointees. I want to be present and I want my Atty. Mr. Thomas Giffe, to be present when the testimony is taken in my case. I have fully understood all your questions and my answers have been correctly recorded.

Katie (her mark X) Cleage

June 6, 1890

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This map is a portion of the wonderful map of Chattanooga at “Forgotten Streets

Katie lived in the one and a half story house off of Cedar. A one and a half story house has a full lower story and a second half story that that is between the ceiling of the lower story and the roof, which makes it smaller than the downstairs because of the sloping roof. Katie mentioned 5 people living in her house in this statement – her two children, a niece and a youth. I wish she had given names!

The Webster J. Colburn (click his name for more information about the Colburns.) and his wife and family lived at the large two story house at 409 6th street. He was an insurance company president. His wife is mentioned in the above testimony and I decided to look for them when Katie gave an address I knew was right around the corner.

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for this post I used Katie Cleage’s pension file. I have found Forgotten Chattanooga to be full of information, photographs and a map of the whole city of Chattanooga in 1901, 1889 and more. The other links above will take you to sites I used. I also used Ancestry.com for background information on Katie and the other people in these posts.

Posts in this series so far:
Katie & Philip Cleage
“Until I Was Obliged to Leave” – Katie Cleage
“My husband purchased her when quite a child…” – Jemima Cleage
“I stood aloof and they took him away” – James Royal
“Even then she followed him” – Isaac Charlton 
“I had well nigh despaired of the case”  
“I have had two children…”
“He was a slave of Alex Cleage”
“…5 months before he was taken”
“She had not married since”
“We owned a hundred slaves”
Index to Special Examiner’s Report


Claimant’s Statement

Deposition H
Katie Clegg
1 March 1890
Chattanooga, Hamilton, Tennessee

Some questions and answers from Katie regarding how she wishes the pension trial to proceed.

Click to enlarge
Click to Enlarge

Posts in this series so far:
Katie & Philip Cleage
“Until I Was Obliged to Leave” – Katie Cleage
“My husband purchased her when quite a child…” – Jemima Cleage
“I stood aloof and they took him away” – James Royal
“Even then she followed him” – Isaac Charlton 
“I had well nigh despaired of the case”  
“I have had two children…”
“He was a slave of Alex Cleage”
“…5 months before he was taken”
“She had not married since”
“We owned a hundred slaves”
Index to Special Examiner’s Report

Index to Special Examiner’s Report

This is the order of the next round of testimonies. Also listed is race, reliability of testimony, and biased for or against Katie Cleage. After these will come a wrap-up and decision regarding Katie’s pension. (I figured out how to make a table and that made transcribing the table so much easier!)

PagesNames of WitnessesExhibitsDepositionsReputation
1
2Notice to ClaimantA
3-4Summary
5-7Claimant’s statementB.Good
8-9John H. Cleage (white)C.Good – Biased against
10Mrs. T. A. Cleage, Sr (white)D.Good – Biased against
11-12David Bridges (colored)E.Good – Unbiased
13-14Millie Valentine (colored)F.Good – Unbiased
15-16Edmonia Charlton (colored)G.Good – Unbiased
17-18Isaac Charlton (colored)H.Good – Unbiased
19-20Minerva Allen (colored)I.Good – Unbiased
21-23Lucy McCaurey (colored)K.Good – Unbiased
24-25Charles A. Cleage (colored)L.Good – Biased against
26-27Thomas Bradford (colored)M.Good – Biased against
28-30Sallie Clegg Marsh (colored)N.Good – Biased against
31James F. Bradford (white)O.Good – Unbiased
32-33Patsey Clegg (colored)P.Doubtful – Biased against
34-35Adeline Sherman (colored)R.Doubtful – Biased against
36-37Katie Clegg (claimant)S.Good – Unbiased
38-41Jemima Cleage (white)T.Good – Unbiased
42-43Lucy McMaurey (colored)U.Good – Unbiased
44-45John L. Atlee, M.C. (white)V.Good – Unbiased
46Copy of record fromW.

Posts in this series so far:
Katie & Philip Cleage
“Until I Was Obliged to Leave” – Katie Cleage
“My husband purchased her when quite a child…” – Jemima Cleage
“I stood aloof and they took him away” – James Royal
“Even then she followed him” – Isaac Charlton 
“I had well nigh despaired of the case”  
“I have had two children…”
“He was a slave of Alex Cleage”
“…5 months before he was taken”
“She had not married since”
“We owned a hundred slaves”

“We owned a hundred slaves “

Deposition “G”

Case of Katie Cleage
No. 288,39128
March 1890
at Chattanooga, Hamilton, Tennessee

Jemima Cleage
That she is 77 year of age and that her post office address is No. 114 Sycamore St. Chattanooga, Tenn

Jemima Hurst Cleage, age 52

Katie Cleage was my slave from the time she was about 13 years old until she gained her freedom. She had two children while she was my slave, but I know of no marriage by her to any one. Philip Cleage was one of our servants, but I know of no marriage between these two parties. I know of no cohabitation between these parties. We owned a hundred slaves at that time, and I know but very little of any of them. Katie was employed as a seamstress by us, and Philip was our coachman. Philip enlisted in the army and came to Chattanooga, and Katie came here also. I do not know who came first. Philip came back to see us after he had enlisted, but Katie had left in the meantime. I know nothing of either of them after that time. I know of no marriage or cohabitation between them after they left our house at Athens. I have seen Katie occasionally since the war. I know of no children Katie has had since the war. It is since the soldier Philip died of smallpox during the war, I guess it was.

            I have understood the questions asked me, and the answers to them have been correctly recorded in this deposition.

Jemima Cleage

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Jemima Hurst married Alexander Cleage in 1832. She brought with her four enslaved people. Their names were Anny, Judi (my 2X great grandmother), Jane and Matilda.

In his Will written in 1833, Jemima’s father, Elijah Hurst, left her those four women “… I will and bequeath to my daughter Jemima Cleage and her heirs forever the four negroes (sic) she has had possession of Big Anny, Judi, Jane, and Matilda together with all the other property I have given her.”

Jemima’s husband, Alexander, wrote in his Will “I give and devise to my beloved wife Jemima Cleage for and during her natural life the following described negro (sic) slaves – to wit: … Juda and her five children  to wit: Charles, Angelen, Lewis, Laura and Frank… I also give and bequeath to her for her natural life a negro (sic) man called Frank the husband of Juda…”   30th day of May 1860 Alexander Cleage

Juda and Frank were my 2 X great grandparents. Lewis was my great grandfather. It gives me some comfort to know that they had been free for almost ten years by the time Alexander Cleage died in 1875.

Alexander Cleage’s Last Will & Testiment
Elijah Hurst’s Last Will and Testament

Posts in this series so far:
Katie & Philip Cleage
“Until I Was Obliged to Leave” – Katie Cleage
“My husband purchased her when quite a child…” – Jemima Cleage
“I stood aloof and they took him away” – James Royal
“Even then she followed him” – Isaac Charlton 
“I had well nigh despaired of the case”  
“I have had two children…”
“He was a slave of Alex Cleage”
“…5 months before he was taken”
“She had not married since”

“She has not married since”

Deposition F

Case of Katie Cleage  22 March 1890
Chattanooga, Tennessee
Woodson Weaver

That he is 45 years of age: that he is a Hackman by occupation and that his post office address is No. 305 Spring St. Chattanooga, Tenn.

I was first duty sergeant of Co. “G” First USCH Artillery. I knew Philip Cleage only in the army. I do not know what became of him. I do not know whether he is living or dead.

Katie Cleage was Philip’s wife. They “went” as man and wife in the army. If she hadn’t been his wife they would not let her stay there. They went together, had a tent in camp and passed as man and wife. I often seen them in the tent together and she used come and stay there for three and four days at a time and no woman unless she was married to a soldier was allowed to remain there. Everyone in camp knew they were man and wife, and considered them as such. I know nothing about their marriage. I only know of them cohabiting together as man and wife in the army.

            I have known Katie ever since the war. She has not married since Philip died. I do not know whether she has had any children or not since the war as I never visit her house. I only know her in passing and re-passing on the street.

            I am in no way related to the claimant and have no interest in her claim.

            I have understood the questions asked me, and the answers to them have been correctly recorded in this deposition

Woodson Weaver (His mark)

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There was no new information in Woodson Weaver’s short testimony so I decided to look at his life and write something about him. At first I was confused at finding a Woodson Weaver in Knoxville, and then in Chattanooga and then in Cincinnati, Ohio. I wondered if I had the same man. I decided that the man in Knoxville was the same man in Chattanooga because once he moved, no Woodson Weaver was found in the records in Knoxville. I was not sure about the Woodson Weaver I found in Chattagnooga until I found his find-a-grave record which showed that he had served in Company G, 1st US Colored Heavy Artillery, which I knew he had.

It was at that point that I decided to search for Woodson Weaver in newspapers and found a disturbing and widely covered event involving his family.

Woodrow Weaver was born into slavery in Wagner, Kentucky about 1845. He was brought to Tennessee at some point and in 1864 he enrolled in Co. G of the USC Heavy Artillary in Knoxville, TN. He was mustered out in March 1866 in Knox County. In December of the same year he married Nancy Rice. Before he was married, his son John Weaver was born, mother not known.

Woodrow and Nancy stayed in Knoxville where he worked as a railroad laborer. By 1880 they had relocated to Chattanooga. In 1884 he began receiving a pension for disability. He had a hearing loss. Nancy returned to Knoxville and died there in 1887. Woodrow worked as a drayman and a laborer. In 1888 his son James Washington/Weaver was born to Rachel Washington. They did not stay together. In 1896 and 1897 we find Woodrow Weaver in Cincinnati, Ohio working as a peddler. His son John shared the house at 1123 Lincoln Avenue and worked as a laborer.

Click to enlage.

In September of the following year, 1898, the two story frame house burned to the ground. The family lived on the first floor and the Maceo Club, a black political club, had the rooms upstairs. The club was named for the black Cuban Revolutionary, Antonio Maceo. The newspapers of the day were full of stories about the Cuban fight to free themselves from the Spanish. The fire started in the club rooms.

In early 1899, Woodson Weaver re-married. His wife died mysteriously soon after the marriage.

In mid May, disaster struck the family. The father Woodson and the son John were both struck down by poison. “Rough on Rats” had been added to their morning coffee. John Weaver died later that day at City Hospital. Sixty year old Woodson Weaver was seriously ill for months. He finally recovered, but never fully regained his health.

Papers all over the country carried sensational stories about the murder. James served a little over a year before he was pardoned and sent home to his mother where he died of consumption

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In the 1900 census, several months before Jimmie died of consumption. He is listed in his mother Rachel’s household, along with an older sister, Katie 19 and a younger brother, Clarence 8. Katie Washington died in 1903 of consumption. She was 22. Rachel died in 1910 at age 55 of Bronchitis. I lost track of Clarence after the 1920 census in Chicago, Illinois.

Woodson Weaver died at the age of 67 in 1907. He never recovered his strength after the poisoning.

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Resources I used for this post include: Katie Cleage’s Pension file, Ancestry.com (censuses, city directories, death records; Newspapers.com.; Family Search marriage records and GenealogyBank

Posts in this series so far:
Katie & Philip Cleage
“Until I Was Obliged to Leave” – Katie Cleage
“My husband purchased her when quite a child…” – Jemima Cleage
“I stood aloof and they took him away” – James Royal
“Even then she followed him” – Isaac Charlton 
“I had well nigh despaired of the case”  
“I have had two children…”
“He was a slave of Alex Cleage”
“…5 months before he was taken”

“…5 months before he was taken sick”

Second statement from James Royal in which we learn Katie was in camp with Philip five months before he died.

Deposition E

James Royal

22 March 1890

That he is 46 years of age; that he is a laborer by occupation; and that his post office address is No. 301 Harrison Avenue, Chattanooga, Tennessee.

            I was a private in Co. “A,” first U.S.C. Heavy Artillery. I enlisted when the regiment was organized and served until March 31, 1866.

            I knew Philip Cleage in my company. I stood on guard with him enough to know him. There in Chattanooga, Philip was taken to the smallpox hospital, and died there, so it was said. I saw them when he was put in the ambulance, and never seen him after that.

            Katie, the “widow,” was introduced to me by Cleage as his wife. I heard Cleage speak of his wife before I saw her. The first time I saw her was in Camps here in Chattanooga, some five months before he was taken sick. They lived and cohabited together in camps as man and wife. I know this because I saw them occupying the same tent and same bunk together, and the officer of the regiment recognized Katie as Philips’ wife. No unmarried “children” or women were allowed in camps. Everyone knew Katie and Philip as man and wife.

            I have not seen Katie and have known nothing of her since they took Philip from the camp.

            Katie was present when they took Philip to the hospital, and she cried and wanted to go with him to wait upon him, but they wouldn’t allow her to do that.

            I am not related to the applicant, and have no interest in her claim.

            I have understood the questions asked me, and the answers to them have been correctly rendered in this deposition.

James (his mark X) Royal

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Posts in this series so far:
Katie & Philip Cleage
“Until I Was Obliged to Leave” – Katie Cleage
“My husband purchased her when quite a child…” – Jemima Cleage
“I stood aloof and they took him away” – James Royal
“Even then she followed him” – Isaac Charlton 
“I had well nigh despaired of the case”  
“I have had two children…”
“He was a slave of Alex Cleage”

“He was a slave of Alex Cleage…”

Chattanooga 1863 National Archives

This is Issac Carlton’s second statement.

Deposition D

Isaac Charlton
1 Mar 1890

That he is 49 years of age; that he is a painter by occupation and that his post office address is Chattanooga, Tenn. (corner of Hurricane Avenue and Line Streets.)

            Philip Cleage served in the same camp with me: Co. “A” First U.S.C.H. Artillery. I knew Cleage for three or four years before the war. He was the slave of Alex Cleage, of Athens, Tenn., and I used to live up there. Cleage was a hale and hearty man up to the time he was taken sick with smallpox here in Chattanooga. This was a short time before the regiment was mustered out. He was taken to the hospital here, and then died of smallpox. I was doing camp guard duty and passed him out to the hospital. He was taken away in an ambulance and in a few days I heard of his death.  It was said he had black smallpox.

            In 6 or 8 months after we were mustered in at Knoxville, the whole company was claiming for a furlough. Capt. Elliott wanted to know who were married and who single, as he wanted to grant the married men a furlough. Cleage and I got a furlough, as we were both married men. I didn’t know who his wife was at that time. I first knew of his marriage to Katie, the applicant, here in Chattanooga, when she came to the camp in the spring of 1865.

            I was first duty sergeant of the company, and had orders to keep all women out of camp, except married women. Katie came there and was admitted as Philips wife. They lived and cohabited together in camp as man and wife. Two women and two men occupied the same cabin and Philip and Katie were two of them. I didn’t know the other couple. They lived together as man and wife until Philip was carried away to the hospital. Philip stated to me time and time again, that he had been married to Katie and that she was his lawful wife. I haven’t a bit of doubt that Philip and Katie were lawfully married under the slave customs, though I was not a witness to the marriage ceremony.  The officers all recognized them as man and wife and no question was raised as to their presence in camp.

            I have seen Katie nearly all the time since the war and know that she has not remarried – at least I have no knowledge of the fact if she had been. She has two illegitimate children since the war.

            I remember Cleage got a furlough for the purpose, as he said, of going to see and get his wife. I don’t think he brought her back. This was while we were at Knoxville, not Chattanooga. This was when we had been in the service 7 or 8 months it is a mistake in my affidavit where it says Cleage got a furlough at Chattanooga, in 1865. But after they came together in Chattanooga, they lived together as man and wife and he introduced Katie as his lawful wife.

            I am in no way related to the claimant and have no interest in her claim.

            I have understood the questions asked me, and the answers to them have been correctly recorded in this deposition.

Isaac Charlton

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Hamilton County Courthouse. Isaac Charlton worked here as janitor for several years. In 1910 it was struck by lightening and burned down.

Isaac Charlton was born into slavery in North Carolina about 1840. He was in the USC Heavy Artillary troop with Philip Cleage. After mustering out, Isaac and his wife Mahala remained in Chattanooga. According to the 1870 census, Mahala could not read or write while Isaac was literate.

Isaac Charlton signed his name on his deposition instead of marking it with an “X”.

Mahala died soon after 1870. Issac married Edmonia Scruggs. They had one daughter, Josephine who was born in 1873. Edmonia was literate and Josephine attended school through the 5th grade. Over the years Isaac worked as a janitor in the courthouse, a porter at a store, a painter and a laborer.

In 1879 Isaac applied for and received his invalid pension for Civil War service. He died when he was 51 and is buried in the National Cemetery in Chattanooga. Because I do not have his pension file, I do not know what exciting information may be there.

Isaac’s wife Edmonia filed for her widow’s pension the month after Isaac’s death. She moved to Knoxville and worked as a cook. She died there of pneumonia on April 6, 1906. She was 58 years old. Edmonia is buried in the Daughters of Zion Cemetery in Knoxville.

Josephine spend some time in Alabama, where she married and gave birth to a daughter. She eventually returned to Knoxville and died there in 1955 at 82 years of age.

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Resources I used for this post include: Katie Cleage’s Pension file, Ancestry.com, Hamilton County Tennessee Geneology Society, google search.

Posts in this series so far:
Katie & Philip Cleage
“Until I Was Obliged to Leave” – Katie Cleage
“My husband purchased her when quite a child…” – Jemima Cleage
“I stood aloof and they took him away” – James Royal
“Even then she followed him” – Isaac Charlton
“I had well nigh despaired of the case” 
“I have had two children…”