The Celebrated Tulane Coffee

Naomi Tulane about four years old. 1904. (Copyright Jacqui Vincent)

This photograph of my grandmother Fannie’s cousin, Naomi Vincent was printed on the cans of Tulane Coffee.  This was one of her father Victor Tulane’s many projects, which included real estate, founding a Penny Bank, and owning Tulane’s Grocery. He was also on the Board of Directors of Tuskegee Institute and a generally active citizen of Montgomery. I found the advertisement below in the Montgomery Advertiser.

V.H. Tulane, Prop. was married to my great grandmother’s sister, Willie Lee (Allen) Tulane. Miss Fannie M. Turner, Mgr., was my maternal grandmother.

Years later, he traveled North selling Alaga Syrup. Naomi traveled with him and it was on a trip to New York City that she met her future husband, Dr. Ubert Vincent.

Alphonso Brown, Victoria McCall, 1970 photo of former Tulane Grocery, More recent photo of empty building.

 

A blog post about an exciting night at the Tulane Grocery Store  He Had Hidden Him Under the Floor

Click photo for more Sepia Saturday posts.

1940 Census – Naomi Tulane Vincent and Household

Jacqueline Vincent about 1940 on the front porch (Photo © jacqueline Vincent.)

I have written quite a few stories about Naomi Vincent and her family. She was my grandmother Fannie Graham’s first cousin. The year and a half before the census had been a life changing one for this family. Naomi’s husband, Dr. Urbert Vincent, died in December of 1938 leaving her a widow with four young children.

In the 1940 Census Naomi Vincent was 41 years old.  She had been born in Alabama. She and her children were  living at  251 138th Street, Harlem, NY.  The house, on “Striver’s Row” was worth $9,000. Naomi had finished 2 years of college. She was not working outside of the home and had a number of boarders. Naomi was the informant for her family. Most of the lodgers spoke for themselves. Everybody in the house was identified as Neg(ro).  All but three people in the house were born in New York. Everybody but 2 year old Barbara had lived in the same place in 1935.

The oldest child, Ubert, was 16.  He was attending school and had completed 3 years of high school. Sylvia was ten, attending school and had completed 4 years of school. Jacqueline was 6 and was enrolled in school. Barbara was 2.  They were all born in New York.

There were 6 lodgers and a servant living in the house. Charles McGill, a widower, was 65. According to the census, he had 1 year of school. He was a butler to a private family and had worked 52 weeks in 1939 earning $80.

Their house, 251 138th Street, is on the far side of the private drive. From Google maps

Seeing that Charles worked 52 weeks in 1939 and only made $80 made me curious about what he had been doing before. Looking back at the 1930 census, Charles had been a lodger in the Vincent home.  At that time he was a chauffeur for a private family.  There were five lodgers in the home in 1930.

Back to the 1940 Census and the other lodgers. Jennie Mount was 71, single and had 8 years of schooling.  She was not employed.  Beatrice King was 31.  She was married, had 3 years of high school and was not employed. Her 6 year old son, Stanley also lived there.  Fifty-six year old Rosalie Moseley was single with 2 years of college. She was born in Georgia and worked as a cook for a private family. In 1939 she was employed for 24 weeks and made $240, which was a lot better than Charles McGill had done. Charles Earle was single and 56 years old. He had 1 year of high school, was born in Connecticut. He was employed as a Red Cap with Grand Central Railroad. In 1939 he worked 52 weeks and earned $900.

Margaret Fuller was a servant in the household.  She was born in South Carolina, 23 years old, single and had worked 8 weeks in 1939, earning $75. Even this was way better than 52 weeks for $80. Maybe they left off a zero. I hope they did.

 To see the 1940 census page with the Vincents click HERE.

Here are some earlier stories about Naomi Vincent: Another Photographic Mystery SolvedMore on the Exciting Vincents, In Which I Hit the Google Jackpot, Naomi Tulane’s Engagement Photo. And one more about Striver’s Row.

 

Another Photographic Mystery Solved – Sepia Saturday #89

Ubert Conrad Vincent
Sylvia Vincent

Yesterday after talking on the phone with my cousin Jacqui and posting the identities of the people in the formerly mystery photo, I decided to look online for a photograph of Ubert Conrad Vincent as an adult.  Instead I found a newspaper article in The New York Age from Saturday, May 7, 1927 with a photograph of him as a three year old.  As soon as I saw it I realized it was the same small boy in another photograph I had from my grandmother’s collection. It wasn’t labeled or dated, but my mother had written on the back “I don’t know who he is but he’s too pretty to throw away!” I hope this doesn’t mean she was tossing photos of those who weren’t all that pretty.

There was also an unidentified photograph of a little girl that is clearly the same little girl in the family portrait, Sylvia Vincent.

To tie this in with this Sepia Saturday’s theme, corner grocery stores, Conrad and Sylvia’s maternal grandfather was Victor Tulane who, among other businesses, owned a corner grocery store housed in the Tulane building on the corner of High and Ripley streets in Montgomery, AL. I offer several photos of the store from 1919 to 2004 below. For other fine photographs and stories about stores of all kinds and who knows what else click SepiaSaturday.

More on the Exciting Vincents – Sepia Saturday #67

Recently I received a phone call from my cousin Jacqui.  We met by phone several years ago.  My great grandmother Jennie was her grandmother Willie’s sister.  Jacqui sent me photographs of ancestors I did not have – one of Eliza (for whom this blog is named) and of two of Eliza’s children – Anna and Ransom.  Earlier this month, Jacqui sent me a packet of information about her father’s side of the family.  Included was this photograph of her father, Ubert Conrad Vincent and also some of his parents.  Read more about the Tulanes and Vincents in these posts.  Hitting the Google JackpotNaomi Tulane’s Engagement PhotographWillie Allen TulaneVictor and Willie Allen Tulane.   Victor, Willie and Children’s Graves.  And more.  I had no idea I had done so many posts on this branch of the family.

Anyway, back to the phone call from cousin Jacqui.  She mentioned that she did not know the names of her grandparent’s parents.  Of course I decided to see what I could find. The information I started with was from a Power Point Program Jaqui used for a presentation about her father.

Andrew B. Vincent

Rev. Andrew B. Vincent

  • Born on Cherokee Territory in Ashville, NC
  • Professor at Shaw University.
  • Later became Dean – School of Theology
  • Received an honorary Doctoral Degree on his retirement in 1904.

Cora P. Exum

  • *Born in Wilson, NC
  • *Professor at Shaw University
  • *Taught Domestic Science
  • *She had 14 children.

I first looked at Ancestry.com and found Andrew and Cora Vincent in Raleigh, North Carolina in the 1900 and 1910.  In both of these censuses everyone was listed as “black” with self and parents born in North Carolina and they were enumerated in Raleigh Ward 3, Wake, North Carolina.

In 1900 the household included

  • Andrew D Vincent  43
  • Cora P Vincent        31
  • Mable Vincent         13
  • Ubert C Vincent         9
  • Cora P Vincent           6
  • Ruth E Vincent           4
  • Baby Vincent              3/12

Andrew and Cora were married in 1884 and had been married for 16 years.  She had birthed 8 children and 5 were living.  His occupation was listed as missionary.  They were all identified as black.

In 1910  the household included

  • Andrew B Vincent  50
  • Cora P Vincent        42
  • Ubrot C Vincent      19
  • Cora Vincent           16
  • Ruth Vincent           14
  • Alfred B Vincent     10
  • Reba G Vincent         6
  • Burnice Vincent        2
  • Alice Hardin  20 (listed as a servant)

Rev. Andrew Vincent was working as a missionary for a Sunday school.

In the 1919 Raleigh, NC City Directory, Andrew, Cora and Cora Pearl Vincent were all listed as teachers.

In 1920 the family was enumerated in New York, New York. Andrew was not ennumerated there.  Perhaps he was out of town on an Evangelistic tour when the census people came to the house because he is back by the 1925 census.
Household Members:
Name                      Age
Cora Pearl Vincent   50
Ubert C Vincent       27
Pearl Vincent            24
Reba Vincent            15
Bernice Vincent        11
Claudia Foy              36
Hebda Vincent           9
Cora was listed as the married head of the household.  Ubert was a doctor at Bellevue Hospital.  The whole household was identified as black and born in North Carolina.

In the 1925 New York State Census, the family is ennumerated in New York, New York.  All were identified as “C” colored.  Housework meant Cora and Pearl were doing their own housework in their own home.

Household Members
   Name                      Age   Occupation

  • Andrew Vincent    67      minister
  • Cora Vincent         45       housework
  • Pearl Vincent        20       housework
  • Bernice Vincent    16       at school
  • Heba Vincent        14       at school

Next I went to Family Search.  I searched for Andrew Vincent and didn’t find who I was looking for, so I put in Cora P. Exum. The first couple to come up were A.B. Vincent and Cora P. Exum for 26 July 1884.  The marriage took place in Goldsboro Twp., Wayne, NC.  There were no parents listed for Cora but A.B.’s were listed as H. Vincent and N. Vincent.  Both were identified as black.

Back to Ancestry.com.  I looked for H. Vincent and found some John H. Vincents in the 1870 census and decided to just look for all the Vincents in N.C. in 1870.  There were over 8,000.  On the first page I found a Nettie Vincent married to Henry Vincent.  I believe they got Nellie’s age wrong as in the 1880 census she and Henry are the same age. Relationships are not given in the 1870 census.

The household included:
Name                    Age
Henry Vincent      35
Nellie Vincent       54
Brown Vincent      12
Phillip Vincent      13
June Enox                2
Abz Bird                    2

Henry was listed as mulatto.  The rest of the family was listed as black.  Henry was a wagon maker.  Nellie was keeping house and Brown was at home.  I know that people often went by their middle names so this seems a good possibility for Andrew’s family.  It would help to know what his middle name was.I found Henry and Nellie Vincent in the 1880 census.  They lived alone.  They were both enumerated as being 50 years old.  Henry was a farmer.

To confuse matters a bit, there was a 60 year old Caroline Vincent living one house over from Henry with her 24 year old son, Brown Vincent. In the 1870 census there was a Caroline Vincent and a house full of Vincents, including a 14 year old Brown Vincent living in the same area as Henry, Nellie and our Brown. I think that this Brown is Caroline’s son and not Andrew Brown Vincent, who should be at Shaw University by that time.

Today I found a death certificate for Phillip Vincent (remember him from the 1870 census above?)  His parents are listed as Henry and Caroline Vincent with the informant being Phillip’s wife.  Perhaps she got the name wrong?  Perhaps Henry had two families and two sons named “Brown.”

I was unable to find Cora Pearl Exum in any census before her marriage record of 1884. Some time ago, I had access to the ProQuest Historical Newspaper Collection and I was able to find and download, many items related to the Tulane/Vincent family.  I finally remembered this and looking through them, I was able to find an obituary for both Andrew and Cora Vincent.   The Chicago Defender, national edition May 28, 1927.  Obituary 2 “May 28, 1927 Physician’s Father Dies.  Andrew Brown Vincent of 116 W. 130th St., father of Dr. U. Conrad Vincent, well known physician of 209 W 135th St. died at his late residence Saturday morning.  The funeral was held Wednesday evening from Abyssinia Baptist church.  “

Ta tum!  His middle name was BROWN!  Today, I goggled Andrew Brown Vincent – Shaw University and found :
VINCENT, ANDREW . . . . . Pleasant Grove, N. C. on page 9 as a student in Shaw University’s Normal Department in the 1876 – 1877 school catalogue.     I also found an ebook  History of the American Negro with an entry several pages long on Andrew Brown Vincent, mother’s name Nellie Vincent.  Much interesting information.

Cora’s obituary reads as follows, with, unfortunately, no mention of parents or siblings.
The New York Amsterdam News June 29, 1932. pg 11

Hold Last Rites of Mrs. Vincent
Mother of Physician Dies at Home Here – Husband Was N.C. Educator
The body of Mrs. Cora Pearl Vincent, 55, who succumbed June 21 at the residence of her son, Dr. Ubert Conrad Vincent, 251 West 138th street was buried Friday beside that of her husband in the family plot at Woodlawn Cemetery.

Three pastors officiated at the funeral services the same afternoon at Abyssiania Baptist Church.  They were the Rev. A. Clayton Powell, Jr., assistant pastor of the church; the Rev. J.W. Brown of Mother Zion and the Rev. Richard M. Bolden of the First Emanuel Church.

Arrangements for the funeral were in the hands of the Turner Undertaking and Embalming Company, 107 West 136 street, and the pallbearers were Drs. Paul Collins, Ira McCowan, Chester Chinn, J.W. Saunders, Charles A. Petioni, William Carter, Jesse Cesneres and Police Sergant Samuel Jesse Battles.

Mrs. Vincent, whose husband, Dr. Andrew B. Vincent, was on the faculty of Shaw University for fifteen years, was born at Wilson, N.C., in 1873.  She resided at Raleigh, N.C., until arrival in New York thirteen years ago.
She was the mother of fourteen children, six of whom survive her.  Besides Dr. Vincent they are Ruth, Pearl, Albert, Berniece and Mrs. Reba Ragsdale, the latter of the Dunbar apartments.  Ruth, who lives in Chicago, came East for the funeral of her mother.  The other children reside at 1849 Seventh avenue, where Mrs. Vincent made her home.


Read a variety of Sepia Saturday posts by other people here.


Sepia Saturday – Naomi Tulane’s Engagement Photograph 1920

Naomi Tulane Vincent.  Her engagement photograph. There is a matching one of her husband Ubert but, unfortunately, I do not have one.  Naomi was the daughter of Victor and Willie (Allen) Tulane.  She was married in Montgomery, Alabama in 1920 and then moved to New York as the wife of a society doctor.  For more Sepia Saturday offerings.