Final List of Enslaved, Wiley Turner Probate – 1865

This was the fourth and final inventory of the estate of Wiley Turner, deceased, formerly of Lowndes County Alabama. In the spring of 1865 the people enslaved in Alabama were emancipated by the presence of the Federal Army.  This list was made in March of 1865. Emancipation followed shortly thereafter. Columns are Name, Age (approximate and if known) and Value.  Number 27.  Joseph, was my great great grandfather. He was my maternal grandmother Fannie Turner Graham’s grandfather.

  1. Fed                    36     $3,500
  2. Nat                               4,500
  3. Andrew            32       4,500
  4. Tony                  37       3,500
  5. Nelson               27      4,500
  6. Cary                   25      3,500
  7. Lloyd                  29     4,000
  8. Freeman            18     4,500
  9. Long George      31     4,000
  10. Jim                       31     4,000
  11. Henry                  30     4,500
  12. Harrison             18     4,500
  13. George                 25     4,000
  14. Lewis                   30      2,500
  15. Bill Tyus              44      4,000
  16. Frank                   18      3,500
  17. Bill Campbell     33      3,500
  18. Prince                  17      3,500
  19. Isaac                    22       3,000
  20. Jessie                   33       1,500
  21. Aolbut                 13       3,000
  22. Adam                   34      1,000
  23. Samuel                47      1,000
  24. Wilson                 40      4,000
  25. Jack                                     500
  26. Jess                       33        4,500
  27. Joseph                  27        4,500
  28. Ed                         15        2,500
  29. Rachal                  72           800
  30. Fanny                   33        1,000
  31. Ellen                     37        1,000
  32. Clary                     25        1,000
  33. Eliza                      49           500
  34. Milly                      67          500
  35. Amy                       41       2,500
  36. Martha                  37       2,500
  37. Hagar                    35       1,500
  38. Emma                   15        3,000
  39. Abigail                45           500
  40. Peggy                  15        3,500
  41. Cherry                48            500
  42. Louiza                17         3,000
  43. Margaret           25         1,000
  44. Harrit                 17          2,500
  45. Fanny(35) &childMary  4,000
  46. Lucy(24)&childRubie    4,000
  47. Frances                            1,200
  48. Polly                                 1,200
  49. Phillis(23)&childSusan 4,000
  50. Betsy                                1,000
  51. Adeline                            2,000
  52. Eliza(29) & child            4,000
  53. May &child Virginia    4,000
  54. Wesley                  8         1,000
  55. Mariah & child Minty   4,000
  56. Ellen                                 3,000
  57. Anna                                 1,000
  58. Georgiana           8           2,000
  59. Tom                                   2,000
  60. William              25          2,000
  61. Julia                    15          1,000

State of Alabama}

Lowndes County}

Probate Court March 14th 1865

Personally came before me James W. Graham Judge of Probate of Lowndes County John A. Tyson, Thomas E Gully and William J Garrett appraisers of the personal estate of Wiley Turner late of said County – deceased, who being severally sworn that the foregoing sheets contain a full and complete appraisement of all the personal estate of Wiley Turner, exhibited to them the said appraisement by James W Turner the administrator on the 13 day of March 1865.

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 14th day of March 1865 James W Graham Judge of Probate

John A Tyson

Thomas E Gully

W.J. Garrett

______________________________________

Related Links:

Joe Turner in the 1852 Estate File of Wiley Turner  – The first list which was made in 1853 when all of the property of Wiley Turner was valued.  It includes names, ages and valuations for all the enslaved before any divisions were made.  My 2 X great grandfather, Joe was about 15 when this list was made.

Second Inventory of Wiley Turner’s Estate – 1856  This list was made to determine the division so that the oldest daughter of Wiley Turner could receive her share of the estate.

Third Inventory of Wiley Turner’s Estate – 1858  This list was made to determine the division when the next child, James, came of age.

Measuring Worth – An article about valuation of the enslaved. It includes several charts about valuation of enslaved people, at various ages and in various years, showing that (as I saw in these lists) values soared from 1852 to 1861.

 

 

 

 

Third Inventory of Wiley Turner’s Estate -1858.

Wiley Turner died in 1851 in Lowndes County Alabama. The first inventory of his personal property, including those enslaved on his plantation, took place in 1852. You can see a list of names, ages and “values” in this post – Joe Turner in the 1852 Estate File of Wiley Turner.  The second inventory was taken in 1856 when the oldest child came of age – Second Inventory of Wiley Turner’s Estate – 1856.

The third inventory  was taken when the second child, James Mosely Turner, reached the age of 21 and wanted his share of the estate.  #63. Yellow Joe, was my great great grandfather. Click on any image to enlarge.

The State of Alabama}

Lowndes County}

To the Honorable E.H. Cook, Judge of Probate for said county The undersigned commissioners under and by virtue of the accompanying and foregoing commission by your Honor made and directed to them to divide the personal Estate of Wiley Turner deceased so as to set off one fifth thereof to James Turner one of the Heirs and distributees of said deceased shows that in conformity with said order after first having taken an oath before a Justice of the Peace to make such distribution fairly and impartially if the same can be made the proceeded on the 21st of December 1857 and continued and continuous until the 8th of January 1858 to divide and value the personal property of deceased as follows ______

Valuation of entire slave property of deceased – names of

  1. Andrew               $1,300
  2. Fanny                     1,100
  3. Tom                           400
  4. Harriett                    300
  5. Perry                        100
  6. Henry                    1,400
  7. Rachel                   1,000
  8. Emeline                   800
  9. Robin, little          1,000
  10. Frank                       800
  11. Fed                        1,100
  12. Clara                        700
  13. Julia                         550
  14. Albert                      500
  15. Freeman                 800
  16. Harrison                 800
  17. Lucy                      1,100
  18. Henry Turner      1,200
  19. Lloyd                     1,200
  20. Margaret                 700
  21. Nelson                   1,250
  22. Betsy                         950
  23. Allen                         300
  24. Peggy                        550
  25. Phillis                       850
  26. Cary                       1,700
  27. Adam                        900
  28. Ellen                          950
  29. Edward                     400
  30. William                     300
  31. George Ann              150
  32. Ben                          1,000
  33. Mary                          900
  34. Peter                          350
  35. Henry McQueen   1,000
  36. Bill Tyus                 1,250
  37. Martha                   1,000
  38. Lewis Tyus            1,200
  39. Amy                           950
  40. Big Robin               1,200
  41. Cherry                       750
  42. Prince                        730
  43. Louisa                        350
  44. Tony                        1,200
  45. Mariah                    1,100
  46. Old Milly                    200
  47. William @@              750
  48. Rachel                        400
  49. Charles                    1,500
  50. William                       400
  51. Fanny                          600
  52. Matt                          1,350
  53. Long Ellen                  550
  54. Moses                          450
  55. Celia                            350
  56. Little Jesse              1,300
  57. Washington           1,250
  58. John                         1,150
  59. Jim                           1,250
  60. George                     1,100
  61. Isaac                            950
  62. Carter                          800
  63. Yellow Joe                1,200
  64. Austin                       1,250
  65. George Morris         1,200
  66. Hannah                        200
  67. Jack                               650
  68. Ellen Bullock               700
  69. Hagar                            700
  70. Sam                               700
  71. Big Jesse                       800
  72. Eliza dark                 1,050
  73. Manerva                   1,000
  74. Eliza Bullock               350
  75. Abigail                          550
  76. Emma                           400
  77. Handy                           250
  78. Turner old man          000

James Wiley Turner’s Lot consisted of:

  1. Henry May
  2. Rachel Patten
  3. Little Robin
  4. Ben
  5. Mary McQueen
  6. Peter
  7. Big Robin
  8. Long Ellen
  9. Moses
  10. Celia
  11. Washington
  12. Carter
  13. John
  14. Hannah
  15. Emeline
  16. Handy

 

Related Links:

The first list which was made in 1853 > Joe Turner in the 1852 Estate File of Wiley Turner

Second Inventory of Wiley Turner’s Estate – 1856

An article about valuation of the enslaved. It includes several charts about valuation at various ages and in various years, showing that (as I saw in these lists) values soared from 1852 to 1861 – Measuring Worth

Second Inventory of Wiley Turner’s Estate – 1856

Wiley Turner died in 1851 in Lowndes County Alabama. The first inventory of his personal property, including those enslaved on his plantation, took place in 1852. You can see a list of names, ages and “value” in this post – Joe Turner in the 1852 Estate File of Wiley Turner.

The second inventory was taken in 1856 when Wiley Turner’s oldest daughter Mary J Hunter had reached the age of 21.  She picked lot #6, which is highlighted in red below.  Click the images of the inventory on the right to enlarge for reading.

“Land of Cotton”  By Edward Warren Day, 1900   Library of Congress [LC-USZC4-11947]
The State of Alabama

Lowndes County

To the Hone. E.H. Cook Judge of Probate for said County.

“The undersigned commissioners appointed by your honor to divide the real and personal Estate of the late Wiley Turner deceased under an order of the 20 January 1856 so that Mary J. a daughter and heir at law of said deceased now the wife of Clinton Hunter could get her part set off to her under said order. Beg leave to report that they met at the plantation  of said deceased. and after first being duly sworn accepted to said ? and valued said slaves separately and then placed them with same other property in six lots of as nearly equal value as possible as follows,”

Lot #1

  1. Austin – a man
  2. Bill Tyus – a man
  3. Henry Turner – a man
  4. Ben a man
  5. Adam – a man
  6. Henry – a man
  7. Martha – a woman
  8. Mary – a woman
  9. Peter – a child
  10. Mary Ellen – a woman
  11. Edmond – a boy
  12. Washington – a child
  13. Betsy woman – a woman
  14. Peggy – a girl
  15. Caroline – a girl
  16. Adaline – a child
  17. Phillis – a woman

Lot #2

  1. Henry May – a man
  2. Jim Swipes – a man
  3. Robin – a man
  4. Joe – a man
  5. Big Jess – a man
  6. Robin – a man
  7. Rachel Clary – a woman
  8. Cherry – a woman
  9. Prince – a boy
  10. Louisa – a girl
  11. Eliza – a girl
  12. Minerva – a woman
  13. Emeline – a woman
  14. Ellen Bullock – a woman
  15. Jack – a man
  16. Old Rachel – a woman

Lot #3

  1. Jess – a man
  2. Wilson – a man
  3. Washington – a man
  4. Cary – a man
  5. Fed – a man
  6. Carter – a boy
  7. Clary – a girl
  8. Freeman – a boy
  9. Harrison – a boy
  10. Julia – a girl
  11. Albert – a boy
  12. Fanny – a girl
  13. Lucy – a woman
  14. George – a boy
  15. Alice – a girl

Lot #4

  1. Mat – a man
  2. John – a man
  3. Tony – a man
  4. George Mims – a man
  5. Sam – a man
  6. Isaac – a man
  7. Mariah – a woman
  8. Ellen – a woman
  9. Mose – a boy
  10. Siller – a girl
  11. Old Hannah – a woman
  12. Eliza – a girl
  13. Abigail – a girl
  14. Emma – a girl
  15. Hagar – a girl
  16. Frank – a boy

Lot #5

  1. Andrew – a man
  2. Nelson – a man
  3. Lloyd – a man
  4. Lewis – a man
  5. Bill Camel – man
  6. Charles – a boy
  7. Fanny – a woman
  8. Thomas – a child
  9. Margaret – a woman
  10. Amy – a woman
  11. Rachel – a woman
  12. Sylvia – a woman
  13. Milly – a girl
  14. Hardy – an old man
  15. A B Turner

Lot #6

  1. Abram – a man
  2. Lewis Tyus – a man
  3. Charles – a man
  4. Jim Pot – a man
  5. Alfred – a man
  6. William – a boy
  7. Mariah Hopkins – a woman
  8. Louisa – a girl
  9. Deller – a girl
  10. Ransome – a boy
  11. Henrietta – a child
  12. Lucy Patten – a woman
  13. Liddy – old woman
  14. Leah – a woman
  15. Sarah Ann – a child
  16. Nelly – a woman
  17. Jane – a girl

 

_________________________

The pages from Wiley Turner’s file included here came from Ancestry.com.

Daniel Freeman – 1861 – 1923 Lowndes and Montgomery, Alabama

daniel-freeman
Daniel Freeman

Daniel Freeman, the father of Joseph Turner’s second wife, Luella Freeman, was a man of mystery.  I cannot find him in a single census, luckily he appears in other records.  I found myself disappearing down his family lines (which are not even my blood lines)  as I tried to get a feel for his life.

According to his death record, Daniel Freeman was born to Ella Freeman in Florida in 1861. I do not have the death certificate. He first appears in 1880 in Mildred Brewer Russell’s book Lowndes Court House, a nostalgic look back at Hayneville from it’s founding in 1820 to 1900. “On the corner of this block, Tuskeena and Washington streets, was the new store of Dan Freeman, colored.” He is mentioned as one of the two Negro merchants in Hayneville during those days.

I could only find him in the 1910 Census where he was listed as 65 years old, owned his own house and was a painter. Throughout the years a Daniel Freeman appears in the Montgomery City Directory as a laborer and drayman in the early years and then a painter and a carpenter. At the same time he was buying property.  I had the feeling that he was always taking care of business.

Here are several of Dan Freeman’s land transactions from the Montgomery Advertiser.

In his Will, written in 1922. Daniel Freeman left property to several of Luella’s young children, his grandchildren. Their father Joe Turner had died and Luella and her family had left the farm in Lowndes County and moved to Montgomery.

Below is a copy of the will. Click on it to enlarge for ease in reading.

will-book-10

daniel-turners-will-blog

 

 

 

 

The information concerning the Turner’s is in part four:  To Mary Jones I give the house and lot known as No. 230 Sutter Street in the City of Montgomery;  to Annie Freeman McQueen I give the house and lot known as No. 165-B Day Street, To Salena Turner I give the house and lot No. 165 Day Street and to Annie May Turner house and lot No. 228 Sutter Street.

Geneva Freeman and Annie Freeman McQueen were Luella Freeman Turner’s sisters. Ella McGhee was the daughter of Geneva Freeman. Salena (Selena) and Annie May Turner were Luella’s daughters.

According to Kyle Chapman, a descendant of Geneva Freeman and Ella McGhee, most of the land was eventually taken by the the state for a highway and the rest was sold or donated to a nearby church.  Also a thank you to him for sharing the photo of Daniel Freeman with me.

Joe Turner Land Transaction – August 11, 1868

On my first trip to the local Family Search Center several weeks ago, the microfilm machine broke as the second roll of film was being loaded. I was afraid the ancient machine would never be fixed so that I could continue my research. Earlier this week the volunteer at the center called to let me know that the machine had been repaired.  I made an appointment to look at more film of my 2X great grandfather, Joe Turner’s land transactions.

It was hot and there was no air conditioning, although I heard what sounded like an air conditioner. Watching the microfilm scroll by made me feel queasy again. Deed book “I”, the first roll I looked through, yielded no information about Joe Turner.

Index Click to enlarge

I had been at the Center almost two and a half hours and decided to go through one more roll before I left. Chewing a new piece of gum to combat the nausea, I began to go through roll “F”, which contained the earliest dated land deal for Joe Turner. It covered from 1860 to 1871.  I was not very hopeful, but scrolled slowly through the index and found that Joe Turner’s transaction was on pages 438 and 439. Slowly scrolling through the microfilm, I learned that a complete rotation of the scrolling handle, took me through 30 pages.

Finally, I arrived at the pages I wanted. As I began to read, the volunteer came in and asked if I realized how long I had been there.  I did, about two and a half hours. She had an appointment elsewhere and I had to stop. I quickly took multiple photos of the two pages, hoping they would come out to be readable. It is difficult for me to take good photographs because of the setup of the microfilm machine.

When I got home, I uploaded the photos to see if there was anything readable. Page 439 was pretty good, but the several shots of page 438, the most important page, were blurred, or my hand with the phone blocked half of the words.  Looking carefully, I was able to transcribe the page, although the bottom left corner was indecipherable.

This morning I got up and opened a couple of the photos in Photoshop to see if I could fill in some blanks in my transcription. I did not see it but, a very readable image of page 438 came up. The Ancestors at work?  Below are those pages and the transcriptions.

State of Alabama}

Lowndes County }

Know all men by these presence in pursuance of the  direction after and of the Probate Court of said County to me this day granted and in consideration of the sum of ninety dollars paid by Joe Turner to Sarah S Givens formerly administrator of the Estate of George Givens deceased – proof which payment has been made I Thomas S Herbert administrator de bonis mon of the estate of said George Givens deceased – have bargained sold and conveyed and do by these presents bargain sell and convey to the said Joe Turner the following described lot or parcel of land to wit: All that portion of land lying west of the lot formerly owned by D C Whipley now owned by me Thomas S Herbert, – and street running North and South by John P Streety’s residence and all of the portion of land lying South of said lot (formerly Whipley now mine) and South of Mrs. Hunters lot – in the town of Hayneville County and State aforesaid, to have and to hold the aforesaid granted premises above (Can’t read) the said Joe Turner and his heirs and assigns forever. Witness my hand and seal this 11th day of August 1868 Thomas S Herbert {seal}

The State of Alabama}

Lowndes County}

  I J.V. McDuffie Probate Judge of said County  certify that Thomas S. Herbert whose name signed to the foregoing conveyance and who is known to me acknowledged before me on this day that being informed of the contents of the conveyance he executed the same voluntary on the day the same bears date. Given under my hand this 11 day of August 1868 J V McDuffie J.P.L.C. The foregoing is a true copy of the original Instrument recorded for record and recorded this 13th day of August 1868.               JV McDuffie

Judge of Probate

________________________________

Unfortunately there was no drawing of this property, but from the description, I wonder if this is the same piece of land that he sold in 1872 described here Joe Turner & Wife Emma Turner Convey Land 1872.

Next week I go back and hope to successfully view the last two rolls of film.  Maybe I will have time to look at Deed Book “I” again.

Joe Turner & Wife Emma Turner Convey Land – 1872

Deed Record Book H. Click each image to enlarge.

Recently I went to the nearby Family Search Center to look at some Lowndes County Alabama property records from the 1870s on microfilm. I hoped to find more details about  Joe and Emma Turner, my 2X great grandparents. I also planned to look at records for other formerly enslaved Turners mentioned in Wiley Turner’s probate record.

There were five rolls of microfilm waiting for me. It was by no means a large research center.  It is actually a few rooms in the educational part of the Church of Latter Day Saints. In a small room there were three computers. Next to it was another small room with a microfilm machine. A local Family Search volunteer opened the building for me and got me started. She loaded the roll into the reader, showed me how it worked and advised me to put a phone book under a piece of paper if the document was hard to read. Then she went to the next room to work on her family history.

After scrolling through to page 238, which I thought was the page I was looking for in Book H, I discovered that there was nothing about the Turners on that page, nor on the pages before or after. I scrolled back to the index. At this point the scrolling was making me feel slightly motion sick but I chewed some gum and kept going. Looking at the index, I found the Turners listed with the “Ts” under a letter “O” on page 97. Very confusing. However, that was actually the page I was looking for and it was full of information about the land deal. There was even a drawing of the property that changed hands. I took photos of the various pages, not very good ones it turned out.

Index with page number for the record I wanted.

As the next roll of film was being loaded, a thin belt separated from wherever it was supposed to be.  The microfilm machine was broken. It was the only machine there and it was ancient. The volunteer said she will try to get it repaired and call me when it is. She also said I can keep the rolls of film there as long as I need them. That is only good if I have a machine to view it through.

Family Search plans to digitize all of their records during the next two years.  They also plan to discontinue sharing microfilm in August of this year. I do not hold out much hope for the repair of the machine, unless a local volunteer can do it.   Below is what I found.

 

Know all men by these presents that we, Joe Turner and Emma Turner his wife of said state and county for and in consideration fo the sum of one hundred dolars to us paid this day by Edward H. Herbert and Louisa Herbert his wife do hereby bargain, sell and convey to the said Herbert and his wife Louisa the following described lots or parcels of land lying and being within corporate limits of the town of Hayneville in said county to wit a lot of about one acre lying west and broadside of the lot now owned and occupied by the said Herbert extending west to a street running north and south by the residence of John P Streety, a lot a strip of land about twenty yards wide south of the above described lot and the said lot owned and occupied by the said Herbert containing one half acre more or less; also a lot known as the Stewart lot commencing at the south west corner of the lot on which H a Rinadi’s house stands, running east thirty five yards, thence south to a street running east and west from the residence of John P Streety by the County jail and up by the Methodist Church, thence west thirty five yards thence north to the beginning containing one acre more or less, also a lot of three fourths of an acre mor or less bounded east by the said Stewart lot south of the street running east and west from the residence of John P Streety up by the jail and Methodist Church, west by a vacant lot owned by the said Streety and north of the east half of the strip of land above described; all of said lots containing three and a half acres more or less to have and to hold to them and their heirs and assigns forever.

Witness our hands and seals this 9th day of January AD 1872.

Signed and delineated in presence of W.H. Taigler  R.McQueen

Plat map with easy to read additions by me.

Joe X (his mark) Turner. Emma Turner

 

 

Joe Turner Constable -1871, Lowndes County Alabama

In 2003 I purchased a copy of the book “Lowndes Court House – A Chronicle of Hayneville, an Alabama Black Belt Village 1820 – 1900”, a book of reminiscences by  Mildred Brewer Russell. In the chapter “Reconstruction And After, 1865 – 1900 I found my great great grandfather, Joe Turner, mentioned as one of the Negro (sic) politicians.  After that I tried to find what sort of politician he was, what office he held.  I could not find anything.

From “LowndesCourt House – A chronicle of Hayneville – an Alabama Black Belt Village 1820- 1900” Page 127 By Mildred Brewer Russell

Last week on Ancestry.com, I found the following information. Joe Turner was elected as constable on November 7, 1871.

Google defined a constable as “…a peace officer with limited policing authority, typically in a small town.”

In 1874 Reconstruction ended in Alabama, resulting in loss of voting rights and the ability to hold elected office for black people.

Here is an interesting timeline that traces how the right to vote and hold public office was taken away from black men in Lowndes and neighboring counties. “The More You Know: A History …”  It wasn’t until 1970, 99 years from 1871, that African American John Hulett was elected  sheriff in Lowndes County.

You can read more about Joe Turner in these posts:

Timeline for Joe Turner

Joe Turner in the 1853 Probate Record for Wiley Turner

Joe Turner, Land, Mules and Courts

Emma and Joe Turner of Gordensville, Lowndes County

Joseph Turner’s Will

There were at one time 4 flourishing schools…

 

Two Coffins Betsy and Austin – 1859, Estate of Wiley Turner

Betsy was about 26 years old when she was listed with her daughter Caroline in the inventory of the estate of Wiley Turner. It was February 2, 1852. Betsy and Caroline were valued at $800.00. On the list below them were eight year old Phillis ($375) and three year old Peggy ($225). They seem to be a family group.

Further down the page Austin is listed. He was 16 years old and valued at $800.

Two pages from the 4 page list of the enslaved on the Wiley Turner plantation. Joe, age 15 was my 2X great grandfather.

On January 26 and 27 of 1859, Betsy was visited by Doctor Pritchett. The cost of the visits was $2.50. On February 6 and 7, Doctor Pritchett visited Austin.

On January 29, 1859 a coffin was purchased for Betsy.  She was 29. On February 8, 1859  A coffin was purchased for Austin. He was 22. Each coffin cost $5. I do not know what they died of.

I found the two coffins listed in the estate file among a list of payments given out from the estate in early 1859. If I had not gone page by page through the file, I would have missed these, as I did when I looked through it last year and only looked for lists of the enslaved.

I found all of these documents in the Estate file of Wiley Turner, deceased, on Ancestry.com.  My 2 X great grandfather, Joe Turner came off of this plantation. Click on the documents to enlarge.

Enslaved & Freed Turners from the Wiley Turner Plantation

For the past week I have been immersed in the Turners who came off of Wiley Turner’s plantation in Lowndes County Alabama.  My 2X great grandfather, Joe Turner, came off of that plantation.  Wiley Turner died in 1851 without a Will and so his estate was probated. The case dragged on for twenty years. There are multiple lists of the enslaved, the first in 1852.  I wrote about the one from 1853 here. The others were from 1856, 1857 and 1865.  There were also the 1850 and 1860 slave censuses, which give no names but age, sex and color (“mulatto” or “black”)

There are also records of doctors visits, some patients named and some not. There are records of how much and what was sold from the plantation during this time. There were several changes of administrators due to deaths and some disputes among members of the family about what was due them.

After the Civil War was over and Freedom came, there were new records for the formerly enslaved and now free, the 1866 census for the first time named the formerly heads of households. In the 1870 census, the whole household was named. In 1880, relationships to the head of the household were given. There were also marriage and land records.

By investigating the community and households, I want to see what happened to the people and families, both before and after slavery. Right now I am going through the material and figuring out how to present it. At first, when going through the probate record, I just looked for the names of the enslaved.  Going over it again, I realized that I could not give a picture without knowing more about what was going on around them, what crops were grown, what was sold,  what was bought and the rest of the turmoil swirling around them during that time period.  Maybe I need to start by printing out the whole file.

I have never done a project like this outside of a time crushing challenge, so we shall see how it goes.

 

Fannie Mae Turner Graham Obituary – 1888 – 1974

Grandmother Clock
From top, clockwise: My grandmother Fannie in the 1950s. My grandmother Fannie was 4 holding her hat. Her mother Jennie holding Daisy. Her father, Howard Turner had been killed. 1894. My grandfather Mershell pointing at Fannie about 1917. My grandmother holding my mother Doris up, 1923. My grandmother in the back, her mother in the front holding baby Howard, on the left my mother Doris and on the right my aunt MV, 1930. My grandmother with her daughters MV and Doris, about 1934. My grandparents Mershell and Fannie (Turner) Graham, about 1945.