Not a bridge, a ferry

In my new batch of photos, I found another photograph in the #160 series that I showed in my last post, here.  I didn’t notice, until after I posted this photo a few minutes ago, that there were words on the building, “Levy Bros.”  “Falls City Ferry and Transportation Co.”  Looking at the landscape, behind the ferry and building, I saw a distant shore.  No longer looked like Athens, TN!  Which is why I deleted that post and started looking things up.

 I googled “Falls City Ferry and Transportation Co.”  and found this entry in ‘The Encyclopedia of Louisville’ page 286.  “The last ferry operation was between Louisville and Jeffersonville.  The original company, facing difficult competition from electric interurban car service over the Big Four Bridge beginning in 1905, was reorganized as the Falls City Ferry and Transportation Co. in December 1920, with David B.G. Rose as principal shareholder.  Among the minority shareholders was Harland D. Sanders, later of Kentucky Fried Chicken fame.  Though the passenger load declined through the 1920’s vehicular traffic increased as automobiles proliferated.  There was as yet no vehicular bridge between Louisville and Jeffersonville.  Fares were low.  During the 1920’s pedestrians were carried for five cents.  Once aboard they could ride all day for that modest fee.”

Louisville is not on the Detroit, MI to Athens, TN route.  It is on the route from Athens, TN to  Indianapolis, IN, where Uncle Hugh Reed still lived.  In fact, I have a photograph of my father and his brothers taken with Uncle Hugh’s sons, perhaps on the same trip.  In this photo we have front row, Henry and Hugh Cleage.  In the back row, Albert  Cleage (my father), Hugh Reed Jr,  Thomas Reed and Louis Cleage. About 1921 in Indianapolis, IN. My father is wearing the same outfit.

Clarence Elwood Reed – Madness Monday

Clarence Elwood Reed was the youngest son of Anna Reed and the brother next in age of to my grandmother Pearl.  When I was collecting stories about the family my aunts and uncles told me that Clarence was a good looking man who went to Chicago from Indianapolis, never married and lived a wild life.

Clarence missed the 1880 census in Lebanon, Kentucky where I found his mother and older siblings because he wasn’t born until 1882.   His mother appears in the Indianapolis, IN city directory in 1893 and I assume that her younger children were with her, joining the older children who had relocated from Kentucky around 1885.  Clarence would have been 11 years old.  In 1893 he appears in his own right, still living at home at 529 Willard, with his mother and older brothers but now out working as a laborer.  In the 1900 Census he is described as doing day labor, being literate and single at 18.  The family has moved down the street to 225 Willard.  In 1906 he has moved with the rest of the family north of downtown Indianapolis to 2730 Kenwood Ave.   Clarence is still laboring. Unfortunately Willard Street is gone and 2730 Kenwood is a parking lot, so no photos of those houses.

In 1908 Clarence married Elnora Jackson in Chicago.  I only found the certificate in the last week on Family Search.  Clarence was about 22 and Elnora was 35.  This marriage didn’t last long.  They were divorced February 3, 1911.  I don’t know if it has anything to do with the time he spent in the Indiana State Prison in La Porte where we find him in the 1910 census.  I don’t know yet what he was there for.  Occupation this time, hotel porter.

In 1915 Clarence is back in Indianapolis, IN where he married Josephine Smith.  She was born in 1888.  I actually found this marriage record, which I sent for, before finding the first marriage.  This record said that this was the second marriage and that the first ended in divorce in 1911.  His job is listed as laborer.

In 1918 Clarence had moved back to Chicago where he was laboring at the Wilson Packing House.  He is still married to Josephine, who he lists as the person to contact on his WW1 draft information card.  He is described as Negro, short, of medium height with brown eyes and black hair.

I cannot find Clarence or Josephine in the 1920 or 1930 census anywhere in the United States.  In 1942 Clarence turns up in the WW2 draft registration cards.  He is described as a light complexioned Negro with black hair and brown eyes.  His contact person this time is Adela Reed.  New wife?  Daughter?  I have no idea.  Can’t find her in 1920 or 1930 either.  He is laboring in Swift and Company Union Stock Yard and is 62, but actually 60 because they took two years off of the birth year that all the other records show and make it 1880.

In 1946 Clarence is mentioned in his oldest brother George’s estate papers as Clarence Reed, brother in Chicago Illinois.  And that is the last I find for Clarence.  So far no death record.  And no photographs.

I plan to send for the application for a marriage license from his first marriage.  I would like to make sure that the prisoner in 1910 is really my Clarence so I need to check on how to determine that.  I’ll keep looking for him in the censuses.  He has got to be there somewhere.

Labor Day – Part 2 (Paternal Side)

Yesterday I posted a chart of 7 generations of my maternal side of the family’s work history.  Today I’m going to do the same with the paternal side of the family.  I have found Lewis and Judy Cleage in the 1870 US Census.  I also found their marriage record.  I am not convinced that all the children listed living with them are their children, if their ages are correct.  But having no other information, I put them in.  I do not know what work the children did in the future.  I think I will look for them again.  Annie Green Reed had two husbands and four more children but I left them off of this chart.  They were all laborers or farmers or housewives.  Both Buford Averitt and Robert Allen come to the family tree as white men who did not acknowledge their black offspring as far as we know.  Oral history and records of birth, marriage and death account for their making it onto my chart.  I’ve pinpointed Buford but there are several possibilities with Robert so he has no job here.  My direct line is highlighted in yellow.  You can see the same chart for my maternal line here  Maternal Family Tree of Workers.

6 generations of my paternal line of ancestors and the work they did.

Two Newspaper Articles 1908 and 1960 – Pearl Reed Cleage

 May 8, 1908   The Indianapolis Star, Friday       Sings in Concert at Simpson Chapel

 Miss Pearl D. Reed The violin recital of Clarence Cameron White will be given this evening at Simpson Chapel under the direction of the Colored Y.M.C.A. Orchestra.  He will be supported by the best local talent.  The following program will be given:
Overture – “Northern Lights,” Y.M.C.A. Orchestra
Violin – Hungarian Rhapsodie, Clarence Cameron White
Song – “Oh Dry Those Tears,” Miss Pearl D. Reed.”
Piano – “Vaise in C sharp minor (b) Polanaise in A major.  Mrs. Alberta J. Grubbs.
Violin – (a) Tran Merel: (b) Scherzo, Clarence Cameron White
Intermission
Orchestra – “The Spartan,” orchestra
Vocal – :Good-by”, Miss Pearl D. Cleage
Readings A.A. Taylor.
Selection – “The Bird and Brook,” orchestra

1908    May 16 The Freeman An Illustrated Colored Newspaper page 4 “The Cameron White Recital” 

Clarence Cameron White ably sustained his reputation as a violinist at Simpson Chapel church last week under the auspices of of the Y.M.C.A. Mr. White plays a clean violin; he gets all out of it there is – dragging his bow from tip to tip, and more if it were possible.  He did not attempt any of the great big things – the big concertos, and perhaps for the best.  Yet he showed his capability for such work and at the same time satisfied his audience.  His encores as a rule were selections that the audience recognized and through the beautiful renditions it could easily form some estimate of his playing ability.  Mr. White was a decided success.  Seldom is has a good class of music been so thoroughly appreciated.  He was supported at the piano by Samuel Ratcliffe whose playing was commendable.  Miss pearl D. Reed proved an acceptable contralto singer.  The orchestra under Alfred A. Taylor did some very effective work.  Mr. Taylor proved a reader of ability; he read several of his own selections.  The audience was magnificent and paid the utmost attention to the renditions.”

 The Detroit Free Press – about 1960

My Grandmother Pearl’s Family Tree

Around 1975 I asked my  paternal grandmother, Pearl Reed Cleage, to send me the names of her parents and grandparents .  I actually sent her a chart to fill out but instead she sent me back a piece of loose leaf paper with a list of her children and their professions and her parents and grandparents and my grandfather’s parents.  I have yet to find anyone with the name of the man she listed as her father.  He is not the father listed on anybodies, including her own, marriage license or birth record or death certificate.  She has her grandmother listed as a Cherokee Indian but when we did the DNA test with my aunt Gladys several years ago the results came back from Family Tree HVR1 Haplogroup L3e2* which is found in West Africa.

The newspaper clipping on the left includes a photograph of my grandmother Pearl Reed from The Indianapolis Star, Friday May 8 1908.  She sang at church and at many community events.

Paternal Maternal DNA line – from the youngest to the farthest back in time fore-mother we can name.
My cousins grandaughters – Lyric
My cousins daughters – Shashu, Jann, Sadya, Lillieanna, Sofia
My cousins – Jan, Anna, Maria
Aunts – Barbara Pearl, Gladys Helen, Anna Cecelia
Pearl Doris Reed 1886 (Lebanon, KY) – 1982 (Reed City, Michigan)
Anna Allen abt 1849 (Kentucky) – 1911 (Indianapolis, IN)
Clara Hoskins abt 1829 (KY) – ? (KY)

This line also includes my grandmother Pearl’s sisters and their descendents.
Aunt Josie’s daughter and her daughter Bessie and any female descendents she has.
Aunt Sarah Busby and her daughters and granddaughters and on down.
Aunt Louise Shoemaker and her daughter, granddaughter, and on down
Aunt Minnie Mullen’s daughters, granddaughters and on down

Hugh Marion Reed

Uncle Hugh Marion Reed

Not many in my family served in the military.  In fact several were conscientious objectors.  My grandmother Pearl’s older brother, Hugh, was the exception.

Hugh Marion Reed was born April 23, 1876, Lebanon, Marion County, Kentucky.  He reached adulthood in Indianapolis,  Indiana and spend his later years in Los Angeles, California.

According to my Uncle Henry, his uncle Hugh Reed passed for white and joined the Navy several times and was a stoker during the Spanish American War.  His uncle told them he would be so tired after his shift that he would just lay down and go to sleep until time for the next shift.  They were locked down there during the shift.

In the U.S. Army, Register of Enlistments, 1798 – 1914, it says that Hugh Reed enlisted 13 July 1898 in Indianapolis, IN for three years.  He was 22 3/12 and a Bridge builder.  He then enlisted in the U.S. Navy out of New York City on 8  December 1898.  He was discharged 2 December 1901 in Boston, MA.

In 1906 he married his wife Blanche C.Young.  They had four children.  Anna, Hugh, Thomas and Theresa.

In 1928, according to the U.S. National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, 1866 – 1938, Hugh Reed, born in Lebanon, KY was admitted 13 December 1928 with rectal prolapse.

He is mentioned in his brother George’s Will in 1946 as living in Los Angeles, CA. So far I have not found a death record for Hugh Marion Reed.