What Ever Happened to Cousin Ernest?

Frebruary_28_collage3

Ernest with his mother and son.

Ernest with his mother and son.

This is the 14th post in the February Photo Collage Festival, and the fourth post of six that will answer the question someone asked when I posted this photograph (follow the link to see it) – What happened to these kids?  Today is the turn of my cousin Ernest Cleage Martin.

Ernest graduated from Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1986.  He had his residency training of Psychiatry at Wayne State University – Detroit Medical Center and Psychiatry at Detroit Psychiatric Institute. Today he  practices Psychiatry, in Anderson, South Carolina with a specialization in Forensic Psychiatry.  When I learned he was practicing Forensic Psychiatry I wondered how he analyzed dead people.  Of course that wasn’t what he was doing. It means that he specializing in psychiatry as it relates to the criminal justice system.

ernest_then_nowIf someone had asked me at that birthday party in 1958 if Ernest would become a doctor, I would have thought they were kidding.  He thought everything was funny, including the kid down the block falling off of his bike. His grades weren’t very good. Sometime during his college career he became friends with someone who made him part of their study group and he learned how to study. At the same time he must have realized that there was a point to it and here he is today, a successful doctor. Following in the footsteps of our uncle Louis and grandfather Cleage. You just never know how life will turn out.  Ernest is still practicing today.  He and his wife have raised two fabulous children and he still has that sense of humor.

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13 Responses to What Ever Happened to Cousin Ernest?

  1. Jan Peterson says:

    Well said! :-)

  2. Hugh Martin says:

    Agreed! I even learned some things (a few of which he may not have wanted me to) haha

  3. Cameron Martin says:

    I’ve learned a few things too lol. But this is well said, especially the part about two fabulous children :))

  4. Paul Lee says:

    Kris, if you weren’t my big sister and married to such a wonderful man, I might PROPOSE to you, that’s how much I admire what you do! (Smile.)

    However, I’m a little surprised that you didn’t include the Dec. 17, 1967, photo of Cousin Nkosi/Ernie as a member of the Shrine of the Black Madonna’s Order of Chaka, the “pre-Maccabees,” bodyguarding your Dad.

    It’s not fair to admit favorites, but he’s always been one of mine, as is his beautiful mother.

    I can hardly wait to see who you’re gonna profile next! What a fantastic idea, and executed with such skill and imaginativeness.

    I have the honor to remain

    Your Li’l Bro’,

    Paul

    • Kristin says:

      Paul,
      I have many wonderful photos of Ernest. In these 5 posts about the cousins at Warren’s birthday party in 1958, I wanted to focus on where they ended up. If I had a bunch of photos of him practicing psychiatry, I would have done a collage. Next up is cousin Dale.

  5. Pauleen says:

    Just shows how some people grow into their careers. Early school marks aren’t everything for sure! I had a smile at the Forensic Psychiatry story :-) What a smart crew you all are!!!

    • Kristin says:

      Pauleen, that’s why it’s so important that people aren’t pigeon holed early in life. Many kids who don’t do well in school, don’t have a support system that can carry them beyond that and into a place where they can thrive and become productive.

  6. Erikka MacNeal says:

    And he gets his great looks from his gorgeous Daddy. Lol I remember working for Ernie as a receptionist. He is very slow (thorough) lol. His patients would be irate with me bc of the long wait. But once they saw Ernie (the 1st Dr. mcDreamy) they were just as calm and jovial. His patients LOVE him. Much like Louis. Funny thing is I still bump into people that rave about Dr. Louis .

    • Kristin says:

      He does look a lot like his father. I did see a complaint about that online, that he was soooo slow. I used to run into people who remembered my grandfather when I was your age too. Always good memories.

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