I claim my Indian blood…

*******

David Gallimore was the second husband of Sally Ragan Hale the 4th child of my great great grandmother Laura Rice Ragan. Today’s testimony comes from his application to be recognized as a member of the Eastern Cherokee.

In 1906, the U.S. Court of Claims appointed Guion Miller from the Interior Department to determine who was eligible for funds under the treaties of 1835-36 and 1845 between the United States and the Eastern Cherokee.

Document found on Ancestry dot com

No. 1013

David Gallimore, being first duly sworn and examined, deposes and says:

My name is David Gallimore:  I was born in Roan Co., Tenn. 1838; I am seventy years old; I claim my Indian blood through my father, James Gallimore; my father was born in N. C. I do not know what county; 1816; my father got his Indian blood through his father; my grandfather’s name through whom I claim was James Gallimore; I think my grandfather, James Gallimore, was born in N. C.: I make no claim of Indian blood through my mother: I was about ten years old when my grandfather died; I am related to James Gallimore: James Gallimore is my third cousin: the grandfather of James Gallimore, David Gallimore, was a brother of my grandfather, James Gallimore: I have been married twice: the maiden name of my first wife was Mariah Baker; the maiden name of my second wife was Sally Hale; none of the ancestors through whom I claim were ever held as slaves; neither I nor any of the ancestors through whom I claim were ever enrolled and never received any money, land or other benefits; my grandfather and father told me that they lived with the Cherokee Indians as a member of the tribe in N. C. and came with them when they came to Tenn.; I never heard of my father and grandfather ever having as Indian name; none of my relatives ever went West with the Indians; in 1851 I lived in Roane Co., Tenn.

David (his mark X) Gallimore

SUBSCRIBED AND sworn to before me, at Harriman, Tenn., this 25th day of June, 1908.

Signed

Assistant to special Commissioner Of the court of claim.

George Hays, being first duly sworn and examined, deposes and says;

My name is George Hays: I knew the father of David Gallimore; his name was James Gallimore; I first became acquainted with him about 1846; I knew the grandfather of James Gallimore or his father in N. C.; I became acquainted in with him in Roane Co., Tenn. The father of David Gallimore told me that he had lived with the Cherokee Indiana as a member of the tribe in Cherokee Co., N.C.; he told me that he ought to have gone to the West with them: he told me they got a white man to be his guardian; the name of his was A. L. Green; he was never a slave; he looked to me to be a full blooded Cherokee Indian.

George (his mark x) Hays
SUBSCRIBED and sworn to before me at Harriman Tenn,. This 25th day of June, 1908.

FAB

David Gallimore, Rockwood, Tenn
Rejected. Ancestors not enrolled, were not living in the Cherokee domain in 1833-6 and 1846 and does not show genuine connection with the Cherokee tribe.

2 thoughts on “I claim my Indian blood…

  1. That’s really interesting. He isn’t blood related to you, though, is he? Unless I’m misunderstanding the relationship, which is very possible. I usually need a chart for these things!
    I think history lessons encourage us to think of different topics in completely different compartments, and I love the way your documents show how real life was (and is) so interconnected.

    1. You are right, he isn’t a blood relative. He was my great grandmother’s sister’s husband. My family did talk about being part Indian, however dna showed that we were not.

      I am going to do another post on him. His family was free at least in 1840.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.