Naomi Tulane

This year I am going through an alphabet of news items taken from The Emancipator newspaper, published  between 1917 and 1920 in Montgomery, Alabama.  Each item was found on Newspapers.com and is transcribed directly below the clipping.   Click on any image to enlarge.

_____________________

Naomi Tulane was my grandmother Fannie’s first cousin, their mothers were sisters. Naomi’s father was Victor Tulane, a very successful black Montgomery businessman. She played the piano at my grandparent’s wedding.

Naomi Tulane’s Engagement photograph
Ubert Vincent, MD – the groom

Montgomery Girl and New York Physician Wed

Montgomery, Ala., May 3.- 1920

One of the most brilliant weddings of the season to take place in this city was that of Miss Naomi Tulane and Dr. U. C. Vincent of New York City, which was solemnized here Wednesday, April 28 at 4:30 P.M., at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. V.H. Tulane, 401 S. Ripley Street. The spacious home was artistically decorated with palms, roses and smylax.

Just before the bridal party entered, Mr. Allen Carleton, the sweet-voiced tenor, sang “Dear Heart”, which was followed by, “O’, Promise me,” sung by Miss Bertha L. Loveless. The wedding march pealed forth and Miss Alma Alexander, bride’s maid, entered, attired in a beautiful nile green taffata with gold trimmings  and picture hat to match. She was followed by Miss Miriam Garrett of Los Angeles, Cal. also bride’s maid, who wore a lovely gown of nile green taffata with trimmings of pink and hat to correspond.

Mrs. Ruth Dixon of Detroit, Mich., sister of the groom, was matron of honor. She was beautifully gowned in white satin with silver trimmings and a hat of shell pink.

The groom entered with Mr. Richard Harris of Montgomery, as best man. Then, Dorothy Lindsey and Victoria McCall, two veritable little fairies, the flower girls, entered, scattering sweet rose petals along the brides path. They were clad in dainty frocks of white organdy.

The bride entered with her father. She was beautiful in a creation of Duchess satin, real lace and pearl trimmings, the veil being trimmed with sprays of orange blossoms. In her right hand she carried a lovely shower boquet and indeed made a beautiful picture.

The ceremony was performed by Bishop J.W. Alstork, while soft music was played by Mrs. T.J. Mayberry who presided at the piano.

Immediately after the ceremony the bride changed to the traveling costume which was a handsome suit of blue tricotine with hat and accessories to match .

Pittsburgh Post Gazette Tue May 4, 1920 advertising a blue tricotine traveling suit.

A large number of guests were present. many handsome and useful gifts were received, including silverware, cut glass, linens, Money and various household furnishings.

The bride is a charming and highly esteemed young woman, the daughter of Mr. V.H. Tulane, a trustee of Tuskegee Institute and a substantial business man. Dr. Vincent is a young and promising physician who has already achieved much distinction in his profession. He is a member of the staff of Bellevue Hospital in New York City being the first physician of the race to hold this position.

A number of prominent out-of-town guests were present at the wedding, among whom were Mrs. Booker T. Washington and Mrs. Mollie Mallett of Chicago, a sister to Mr. Tulane; Miss Miriam Garrett, Los Angeles, Cal; Mrs Ruth Dixon, Detroit, Michigan.; Mrs. H.C. Bryant, Miss Nellie Bryant, Mrs. W. M. Coleman, Mrs. Alice Jackson, Dr. A. M. Brown, Birmingham, Ala.; Mrs. Jordan Taylor and Mr. and Mrs Peat of Wetumpka, Ala.; Miss B. Davis, Miss Marie Simms and Mrs. Taylor of Columbus, Ga.

Amid showers of congratulations the young couple left on the evening train for New York City, their future home.”

Bridal Breakfast Served By Mr. W. Simon

“On last Wednesday morning Mr. Willie Simon, expert caterer of High Street presented the bridal party of the Tulane-Vincent wedding with an elaborate bridal breakfast.

It was a feast so artistically and temptingly prepared that it displayed in a high degree the great genius which Mr. Simon possesses in the culinary art. The bill of fare was as follows:

Planked Spanish mackerel.  (note: the picture in the link is not exactly the same, but the picture will give you an idea of planked mackerel with potatoes surrounding..)

Dutchcess Potatoes encircled all around the plank with four large pockets, garnished with pimentoes and parsley.

One pocket contained asparagus; another contained extra sifted early green peas. A third pocket held mushrooms, while the fourth was filled with Mexican sugar corn.

In the center of the plank was mackerel surrounded with creole sauce, and on the sides of plank were stuffed bell pepper and tomatoes with Risote.

In the center and top of the fish was a large grapefruit made into a basket which held a combination salad. On the handles of the basket were stationed two small dolls dressed as bride and groom.”

 

_____________

There were so many articles about the wedding, that I am not going to write up her life. The links below are about Naomi Tulane Vincent’s life.

The Celebrated Tulane Coffee

Naomi Tulane Vincent and son Ubert

Mystery Photograph Identified

Another Photographic Mystery Solved

More on the Exciting Vincents

In Which I Hit the Google Photo Jackpot

1940 Census – Naomi Tulani Vincent

_________________________

 The news items were found on Newspapers.com. The photos are from my collection.

13 thoughts on “Naomi Tulane”

  1. Sounds like quite the wedding! In those days the papers always called the women “Mrs Husband’s Name”… which in itself takes a bit of sleuthing to figure out who they are and if they are related.

  2. She must have been a beauty, but I wonder why her photo was at such an extreme profile, as if to emphasize her hair instead of her face. Her hair did look beautiful though. I have read other wedding reports describing bridesmaids in Nile green dresses. I’ll have to look that up.

    1. My husband and I were talking about that last night, I said it was her hair too. Not only Nile green dresses, but they went away in blue traveling suits immediately afterwards.

  3. A brilliant wedding, indeed. And a brilliant reception, too. Thanks for the links on smylax and tricotine suits and all the rest. The little nitty-gritty details are what really give you a picture of what it was like.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.