A Mystery Rider & A Run-Away Horse – Sepia Saturday #182

stranger on horse_mexico

Unknown Rider – Mexico 1960s.

#1  During the 1960s my Uncle Louis and various family members and friends traveled to Mexico. They stayed in out of the way hotels and places. Louis became very proficient in Spanish and was happy to talk to any of us in Spanish. Unfortunately, I never was invited on any of these trips. The above photo is an unmarked photo from the Cleage collection. I think it was taken in Mexico. Then again, maybe it was taken in Michigan in the country during the 1940s.

#2  I posted this article about a horse jumping through a windshield in 2011.  Thought I would give it another go.  Victor Tulane was my great grandmother’s sister Willie’s husband. He was a successful Montgomery businessman.

horse+jumps+through+car+windshield

Horse Jumps through Automobile Windshield

Considerable Excitement Attends Runaway On Court Square Tuesday Afternoon.

Much excitement and some damage was the result of a run-away horse crashing into an automobile in front of Alex Rice’s store on Court Square late yesterday afternoon.

The horse, which was pulling a buggy, became frightened on the first block of South Court Street and dashed toward Montgomery Street.  An automobile belonging to Theo Meyer was parked in front of Alex Rice’s and the front feet of the horse went through the wind shield.

Beyond sustaining several minor cuts, the horse was unhurt and the damage done to the automobile, too, was small.

Victor Tulane was owner of the horse.

Date: January 27, 1915
Location: Montgomery, Alabama

Paper: Montgomery Advertiser
Article from The GenealogyBank

 

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27 Responses to A Mystery Rider & A Run-Away Horse – Sepia Saturday #182

  1. Wendy says:

    Two perfect entries! I tell ya, a runaway horse is no joke. I was at a horse show when a little girl found herself on a runaway horse heading for a fence. Everyone gasped in wide-eyed fear waiting for it to be over. Fortunately the horse stopped. Scary business.

    • Kristin says:

      My only runaway at the fair was a runaway hog. it rounded the corner coming at us, me and my little sister and younger cousin, who jumped behind me. Luckily the owners were hot on his trail and caught him before he trampled us to death. Not as big as a horse but still impressive, a runaway hog.

  2. Alex Daw says:

    Look at all those photos of your family on horses!! Amazing. You have reminded me that I found a newspaper article about an escaped horse or horses owned by my great-grandfather in Sydney. Must hunt that article down again. I love Saturdays. A chance to blog and catch up with all my blogging friends. Thanks for the post.

    • Kristin says:

      Look forward to read your horse story! That’s what I love too. And makes me dig up things I might never even think of without Sepia Saturday.

  3. A great post Kristin, as to run away horses, it proves my point that they are large and should be in fields chewing grasses and apples!

    • Kristin says:

      I feel that way too but I also regret I never got familiar with horses and learned to ride. Looks like a peaceful pastime.

  4. postcardy says:

    I like the way the photo looks so mysterious.

  5. Karen S. says:

    It is a lovely entry for the mysterious and also the wishful and hopeful rides one dreams of doing but seldom does. It’s so peaceful and carefree to hop on a horse and just ride.

  6. Beth L. says:

    I love that my dad and Raven made it onto the end of your banner! Who is holding the hat? Are those your grand kids in the center?

    • Kristin says:

      From L to R: Hugh in Mexico; Warren and his granddaughter in SC; My grandkids ( who are twins :) also in SC; A family friend – Grover Whals in Idlewild after a parade and your dad looking too cool on Raven.

  7. Brett Payne says:

    I’m glad to hear that the mystery of the unknown rider makes it special, rather than marking it as one of those to be discarded, as seems to happen to so many unidentified photos these days.

  8. Sharon says:

    I have been on a runaway horse when it bolted for home. I was SO scared. I now look back and wonder how I stayed on!

  9. Titania says:

    That was lucky; horses get quickly frightened, I have experienced it twice on the farm.

  10. ScotSue says:

    A great link to the horsey theme.

  11. Bob Scotney says:

    The first horse I sat on turned into a runaway too after the girl who owned it tapped it with a whip. That’s why it was the first and last horse I have ‘ridden.’ Now I just talk to the riding school horses when they are turned out into a local field.

  12. Kristin says:

    I’m seeing a lot more runaway horses here than I would have expected. Too bad nobody got photos of the experience !

  13. Little Nell says:

    I like the movement in that picture and the runaway horse story is a nice addition to this interesting post.

  14. Joan says:

    I particularly liked the the family on horseback selection of photos, especially the fellow in the parade attire. My daughter-in-law rides in a parade unit of her horse club, and they travel to all sorts of parades, festivals and rodeos throughout the summer — and they bring home a prize or so.

  15. TICKLEBEAR says:

    Never been to Michigan but the landscape seems to me more American than Mexican…
    Could be wrong!!
    Glad the horse didn’t get hurt [too much].
    Must have been an embarrassing moment for Victor…
    :D

  16. Sheryl says:

    Whew, it was so fortunate that no one was seriously injured by the runaway horse. When I was young my father used to tell stories from his childhood of runaway horses–and sometimes the endings were very sad.

  17. Josna Rege says:

    Any news on the mystery rider? Does he have a saddle or is he riding on a blanket?

    And the runaway horse! The closest modern-day equivalent in my family was when my brother-in-law didn’t put his brakes on when he parked his car on one of those hills in San Francisco. It rolled down the hill, gathering speed, and crashed into somebody’s fence. There were damages to pay, but nobody was hurt.

    I never had the chance to get a close feeling for horses, though I enjoyed riding them on the (very) few occasions I was able to do so, in India. Always amazing to realize how recently they were a major means of transportation. My mother’s aunt and uncle had a horse-drawn barrow in London, which they used to sell vegetables, I think. And my Uncle Len loved to ride whenever he got the chance, and though he didn’t own a horse, he would go down to a local stables, groom them, and generally make himself useful in an yway that he could, just so that he could be near them.

    • Kristin says:

      I don’t think we will find out who the mystery rider is. When I zoom in on the original he has a saddle on a blanket.

      A runaway car is scary. I had a experience with the breaks going out and the car continuing to move forward and hitting the car in front of us. No injuries but scary. And once the car skidded out of control on snow.

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